Activists Find Place in Tamil Nadu Animal Welfare Board – The New Indian Express

Express press service

CHENNAI: With an increase in animal cruelty complaints and stray animal issues, the state government has decided to include animal rights activists in the reconstituted Tamil Nadu Animal Welfare Board for better awareness of the audience.

Until now, the board was run by bureaucrats acting as ex-officio members and CM was the chairman. Now the necessary changes have been made to create three honorary member positions. According to a GO recently published by the additional chief secretary of the livestock department TS Jawahar, the council was reconstituted on July 26 and two animal welfare activists – Shruti Vinodh Raj and AP Nambi – were made honorary members. They were carefully selected based on their merit and background from several applications received. The board is also looking to fill the third position.

Shruti has a decade of experience in animal welfare and is currently a member of Tamil Nadu University of Veterinary and Animal Sciences (TANUVAS) and Animal Birth Control Oversight Committee of Greater Chennai Corporation. Shruti regularly coordinates with law enforcement to rescue animals from the illegal trade. A week ago, 18 camels were saved from slaughter. The other honorary member AP Nambi is a former professor of TANUVAS.

Sources said the decision to have a dedicated animal welfare council for Tamil Nadu was made in 2018, after the Jallikattu protests activists were deliberately kept out of the council all these years due to their adamant opposition to Jallikattu and other lingering issues.

However, the government, having succeeded in preserving the traditional sport, sees things differently in the wider interests of animals, domestic and wild. For example, the government announced the Vallalar Palluyir Kappagangal scheme in the latest state budget, allocating Rs 20 cr to support NGOs that care for abandoned and injured pets and strays. He was praised by animal rights activists.

Shravan Krishnan from the Besant Memorial Animal Dispensary said: “Counseling should come with standard protocols, regular inspections should be carried out and monthly reports should be requested. The inclusion of activists will help bureaucrats in decision-making.

CHENNAI: With an increase in animal cruelty complaints and stray animal issues, the state government has decided to include animal rights activists in the reconstituted Tamil Nadu Animal Welfare Board for better awareness of the audience. Until now, the board was run by bureaucrats acting as ex-officio members and CM was the chairman. Now the necessary changes have been made to create three honorary member positions. According to a GO recently published by the additional chief secretary of the livestock department TS Jawahar, the council was reconstituted on July 26 and two animal welfare activists – Shruti Vinodh Raj and AP Nambi – were made honorary members. They were carefully selected based on their merit and background from several applications received. The board is also looking to fill the third position. Shruti has a decade of experience in animal welfare and is currently a member of Tamil Nadu University of Veterinary and Animal Sciences (TANUVAS) and Animal Birth Control Oversight Committee of Greater Chennai Corporation. Shruti regularly coordinates with law enforcement to rescue animals from the illegal trade. A week ago, 18 camels were saved from slaughter. The other honorary member AP Nambi is a former professor of TANUVAS. Sources said the decision to have a dedicated animal welfare council for Tamil Nadu was made in 2018, after the Jallikattu protests activists were deliberately kept out of the council all these years due to their adamant opposition to Jallikattu and other lingering issues. However, the government, having succeeded in preserving the traditional sport, sees things differently in the wider interests of animals, domestic and wild. For example, the government announced the Vallalar Palluyir Kappagangal scheme in the latest state budget, allocating Rs 20 cr to support NGOs that care for abandoned and injured pets and strays. He was praised by animal rights activists. Shravan Krishnan from the Besant Memorial Animal Dispensary said: “Counseling should come with standard protocols, regular inspections should be carried out and monthly reports should be requested. The inclusion of activists will help bureaucrats in decision-making.

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