Advocates – Animal Rights Cafe http://animalrightscafe.com/ Tue, 09 Aug 2022 17:25:00 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://animalrightscafe.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-6-150x150.png Advocates – Animal Rights Cafe http://animalrightscafe.com/ 32 32 Assemblyman Tom Lackey joins health and safety advocates in opposing SB 930 https://animalrightscafe.com/assemblyman-tom-lackey-joins-health-and-safety-advocates-in-opposing-sb-930/ Tue, 09 Aug 2022 17:25:00 +0000 https://animalrightscafe.com/assemblyman-tom-lackey-joins-health-and-safety-advocates-in-opposing-sb-930/ SACRAMENTO, Calif., August 9, 2022 /PRNewswire/ — Assembly Member Tom Lackey (R-Palmdale) will join health and safety advocates from Alcohol Justice, the California Alcohol Policy Alliance (CAPA), and the Friday Night Live Partnership at a Capitol press event to oppose California SB 930. The “gut & amend” bill, drafted by the senator Scott Wiener (D-San […]]]>

SACRAMENTO, Calif., August 9, 2022 /PRNewswire/ — Assembly Member Tom Lackey (R-Palmdale) will join health and safety advocates from Alcohol Justice, the California Alcohol Policy Alliance (CAPA), and the Friday Night Live Partnership at a Capitol press event to oppose California SB 930. The “gut & amend” bill, drafted by the senator Scott Wiener (D-San Francisco) and Assemblyman Mark Haney (D-San Francisco), is the 5e attempt since 2013 to disrupt the protections of California uniform statewide last call.

The SB 930 would extend the closing hours of retailers on sale from 2 a.m. to 4 a.m. under a dangerous “pilot program”. The experiment would take place in 6 cities: San Francisco, Oakland, West Hollywood, cathedral city, Coachellaand Palm Springs. Fresno was originally on 7e city ​​in the pilot program but asked to be removed from the bill due to opposition from Fresno city ​​leaders.

What: Press conference
When: Wednesday, August 10, 2022 12:00 p.m.
Where: “Traffic Circle” – The Library & Courts Building, 914 Capitol Mall, Sacramento, California 95814
Who:

  • Tom Lackey, California Member of Assembly (District 36)
  • John Lovell, California College and university police chiefs
  • Cruz AvilaManaging Director, Alcohol Justice
  • Carson Benowitz-FredericksMSPH, CHES, Research Director, Alcohol Justice
  • Kelly GoodwinFriday Night Live Partnership (tentative)
  • Fred JonesCalifornia Council on Alcohol Problems, California Alcohol Policy Alliance (CAPA)

Why:

There is no “local control” when it comes to alcohol because the danger, harm, and cost will not stay in the “pilot project cities” where alcohol consumption and economic benefits occur. If the bill becomes law, all communities surrounding the pilot project towns will be threatened by late-night drinkers traveling drunk and tired until the early morning commute hours.

According to the Center for Disease Control (CDC), California currently suffers more annual alcohol-related harm than any other state: 11,000 alcohol-related deaths, $35 billion in total costs, $18.5 billion at state expense. The CDC also identifies maintaining existing last-call hours as one of 10 key policies to reduce the harms of reckless drinking and alcohol-related deaths in motor vehicles.

Opposition to SB 930 is growing across the state. Last week, the Los Angeles City Council passed an opposition resolution and the powerful Los Angeles County Democratic Party (LACDP) came out against SB 930 in a letter dated June 27, 2022. The Fresno City Council will vote on an opposition resolution this week.

SB 930:

  • Is a poorly designed and insufficiently funded pilot project
  • Removes uniform statewide protections 2am last call
  • At least costs the state $3-4 million per year to administer, mitigate damage and clean up highway blood; costs millions more to towns and villages in “Splash Zones”
  • Disregards 40 years of peer-reviewed public health research on the dangers of extending the last call
  • Ignores the current annual alcohol damage disaster in California
  • Uses the false narrative of the COVID economic recovery to subsidize and reward late-night liquor vendors at government and taxpayer expense

Alcohol Justice encourages the public to ACT to STOP SB 930: Text JUSTICE to 313131 or visit: https://alcoholjustice.org/take-action/stop-sb-930-no-late-last-calls-in- ca-not-now-not-never

CONTACT:

Jorge Castillo 213 840-3336


Michel Scippa 415 548-0492



SOURCE Alcohol Justice; California Alcohol Policy Alliance

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After Supreme Court Ruling, Immigrant Rights Advocates Push to End ‘Stay in Mexico’ Policy | Latin voice | Chicago News https://animalrightscafe.com/after-supreme-court-ruling-immigrant-rights-advocates-push-to-end-stay-in-mexico-policy-latin-voice-chicago-news/ Sun, 07 Aug 2022 17:02:44 +0000 https://animalrightscafe.com/after-supreme-court-ruling-immigrant-rights-advocates-push-to-end-stay-in-mexico-policy-latin-voice-chicago-news/ The Supreme Court has certified its ruling authorizing the Biden administration to end the Migrant Protection Protocols policy, better known as “Stay in Mexico.” The policy was part of former President Donald Trump’s border policy requiring migrants seeking asylum in the United States to wait in Mexico for hearings. In June, a Supreme Court ruling […]]]>

The Supreme Court has certified its ruling authorizing the Biden administration to end the Migrant Protection Protocols policy, better known as “Stay in Mexico.”

The policy was part of former President Donald Trump’s border policy requiring migrants seeking asylum in the United States to wait in Mexico for hearings. In June, a Supreme Court ruling overturned a lower court that forced the policy to be reinstated in December. But while President Joe Biden has previously tried to end the policy, there has been little comment so far on when his administration might officially follow through.

Gladis Molina Alt, Executive Director of the Young Center for Immigrant Children’s Rights, said she had spent time along the US-Mexico border and the situation remained very difficult for migrants in limbo.

“What I saw on the ground were families, parents, we talked about having to make a tough decision about whether they should stay in Mexico while they wait for their case to be processed or make this tough decision to bring their children across the border alone. while they stay in Mexico. So family unity is something that we have seen to be an issue on the pitch,” Molina Alt said. “We also heard from the two people who are in these MPP camps talking about the security issues they face, the kidnappings that are happening, the rapes that have happened, the human rights abuses for them in as migrants in Mexico that take place.”

The MPP policy isn’t the only policy still in place under Biden that’s problematic for immigrants, said Helena Olea, associate director of programs at Alianza Americas.

“With the pandemic, the Trump administration enacted Title 42 on the pretext that the border needed to be closed for public health reasons. So we need to understand the interplay between these two policies because even though there is an end to MPP, Title 42 continues to work,” Olea said. “And most people who try to seek asylum are rejected, deported and sent back to Mexico. So when you look at the numbers, there are over two million people impacted by Title 42. And the number of people impacted by MPP, while significant, is less, around 80,000 or 90,000 people.

Daysi Funes, Executive Director of Centro Romero, said that while much of the attention regarding the MPP is focused on the border, the effects of the policy are being felt across the country, including among Chicago-area immigrants.

“We are still seeing the consequences of people whose families have been separated, that’s the hardest part because we’re talking about one of the biggest groups that has started to come in, which is women and children,” he said. said Romero. “That’s why we see a lot of kids in cages before the Trump administration. And even though this administration said right now, well, we don’t have them in cages and we have a special space. They are still in jail, they are still under CBP protection. So what we see is our families waiting to receive their families here. We are looking at what happened to the Ukrainians, are we not? treatment they received as immigrants and as refugees coming to this country has a very different approach from the administration than those who come from south of the border.


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North Charleston is hiring a homelessness coordinator. Proponents say more resources are needed. | New https://animalrightscafe.com/north-charleston-is-hiring-a-homelessness-coordinator-proponents-say-more-resources-are-needed-new/ Fri, 05 Aug 2022 18:00:00 +0000 https://animalrightscafe.com/north-charleston-is-hiring-a-homelessness-coordinator-proponents-say-more-resources-are-needed-new/ NORTH CHARLESTON — Along Tanger Outlet Boulevard, construction continues on the 72-bay Topgolf facility, which is expected to be a premier entertainment venue. Next to this site, land has been cleared for a $200 million mixed-use development that will include apartments, hotels and restaurants. In a small wooded area across the street, cardboard boxes help […]]]>

NORTH CHARLESTON — Along Tanger Outlet Boulevard, construction continues on the 72-bay Topgolf facility, which is expected to be a premier entertainment venue. Next to this site, land has been cleared for a $200 million mixed-use development that will include apartments, hotels and restaurants.

In a small wooded area across the street, cardboard boxes help create a makeshift home in an encampment for those who have nowhere to live.

Juxtaposition is becoming an increasingly common site in North Charleston, the state’s third-largest municipality. As the city continues to grow, so does its homeless community.

To address the issue, North Charleston recently hired a homelessness coordinator who seeks to connect homeless people with resources, such as mental health care and identification, indicating to some a city effort to resolve the problem. However, the effort is drawing mixed reactions from homelessness advocates who applaud the decision but say few resources are being devoted to the issue.

Proponents say hiring a coordinator should only be a first step. They hope the city will engage in other solutions, such as creating a shelter. There is no homeless shelter in North Charleston.

“It’s great,” said Aaron Comstock of Uplift Charleston, a group that has for years organized weekly distributions of food, clothing and hygiene items. “But are they going to be active in creating spaces for the homeless, like a shelter?”

North Charleston, home to over 100,000 people, has long had a large homeless population.

The latest point-in-time count, conducted in 2020, indicated that there were 4,287 homeless people in South Carolina. The report concluded that 323 people in Charleston County were homeless, a slight increase from 318 unsheltered in 2019.

Although there are no reports for 2021 and 2022, elected officials and advocates say the homeless population is growing and becoming more visible as new developments move tent communities to more visible areas. .

New projects on Tanger Outlet Boulevard, for example, camps for displaced homeless people who resided on previously undeveloped property, Councilman Michael Brown said.

Rising housing costs, job loss and mental health issues are a few factors that homelessness advocates say are contributing to the rise in homelessness.

The problem has long been visible in some sections of North Charleston, such as along the southern section of Rivers Avenue near the CARTA Superstop at Cosgrove Avenue. There, the former United Methodist Cherokee Place served as a hub for social services.







Brandon Lilienthal

The City of North Charleston has hired Brandon Lilienthal as Homelessness Coordinator. Lilienthal will work to connect homeless people with resources, such as mental health care and identification. Provided



Some homeless people live largely out of sight in their encampments, like the one behind the Walmart Supercenter on Rivers Avenue. This place is among several well known to police, elected officials and residents.

The new town coordinator, Brandon Lilienthal, has the experience necessary for the task at hand. Lilienthal, a Burke High graduate who earned a master’s degree in rehabilitation counseling from South Carolina State University, previously held a similar position at the Charleston Dorchester Mental Health Center. The North Charleston position was created based on an executive decision by Mayor Keith Summey, who told a city council meeting months ago that Lilienthal had been hired to help the city figure out what she can do “to help (the homeless) move beyond where they are.”

Lilienthal said her goal is to listen to people to understand their needs, then connect them to needed resources. Lilienthal spent the first four weeks in her new role doing just that, visiting tent communities and getting to know those in the city with no place to shelter.

People’s needs vary. Some homeless people are in North Charleston but want to return to their hometowns, often in other states. A homeless man who had traveled to the Charleston area from Memphis worked at Walmart but quit his job due to illness. The man said he had checked with a few shelters, but none had a place available. Lilienthal put him in touch with a homeless program in his hometown.

Others needed help obtaining official documents. Lilienthal said a common need was to get proper identification.

“I’m just going to try to help them achieve the goals they’ve set for themselves,” Lilienthal said.

The new city coordinator also recognizes the importance of connecting these people to mental health resources. The Charleston Dorchester Mental Health Center is partnering with the City of Charleston in an effort that allows therapists to visit homeless communities and speak with people who may be in need. Lilienthal hopes to establish a similar partnership in North Charleston.

The task, however, is a tall one, given the hundreds of homeless people who have been reported in point counts. Not to mention the ones that never show up in the reports.

Some homelessness advocates say one city coordinator is simply not enough.

Since Lilienthal will be working one-on-one with individuals, it appears her role will be that of a sort of case manager, said the Reverend Kara Stewart, executive director of the nonprofit Neighbors Together which has been providing for years food, clothing, rental. support and other services.


Nonprofit Officially Moves to North Charleston with $2 Million Purchase of Former Church

In this case, the city will need about six case managers in order to effectively meet a large number of homeless people, Stewart said.

“It’s definitely a bigger investment that needs to be made if that’s the approach they want to take,” Stewart said.

Meanwhile, plans to create housing for the homeless in North Charleston have not materialized.

Neighbors Together wants to transform a building it owns on Reynolds Avenue into a transitional housing space for single mothers. But these plans were blocked by the refusal of the community, which wanted a chance to influence the project. The building also needs a rezoning to accommodate residential use.

The organization was able to help four women who came to the association this week in need of housing assistance, one of whom had received an eviction notice. Temporary housing space is needed for those who are on the verge of losing their living space due to high housing costs, Stewart said.

“It would be a safety net,” she said. “At the moment there is no safety net.”

In May 2021, when the city council discussed using federal COVID-19 relief funds to support nonprofits serving the homeless community, Summey spoke about the need for a shelter in North Charleston. At the time, the mayor expressed a desire to work with Charleston County to transform the former prisoner release center on Leeds Avenue into a center that can accommodate homeless people. These plans have not seen any real progress.

“Nothing has materialized so far,” city spokesman Ryan Johnson said.

Brown, who applauded the city’s decision to hire a coordinator, said establishing a homeless shelter in North Charleston should be a tri-county initiative because such a site would likely serve the homeless. of the whole region.

Summerville Nonprofit Serving Hundreds of Underprivileged Youth

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As Experts Discuss Monkeypox Response, Supporters Demand More Action https://animalrightscafe.com/as-experts-discuss-monkeypox-response-supporters-demand-more-action/ Wed, 03 Aug 2022 17:18:30 +0000 https://animalrightscafe.com/as-experts-discuss-monkeypox-response-supporters-demand-more-action/ Leading experts and public health officials discussed national and global responses to the growing monkeypox epidemic at the 24th International AIDS Conference (AIDS 2022) this week in Montreal, but advocates say the world is not not doing enough to deal with the crisis, which mainly affects gay and bisexual men. Opening a hastily organized media […]]]>

Leading experts and public health officials discussed national and global responses to the growing monkeypox epidemic at the 24th International AIDS Conference (AIDS 2022) this week in Montreal, but advocates say the world is not not doing enough to deal with the crisis, which mainly affects gay and bisexual men.

Opening a hastily organized media roundtable on July 31, the new president of the International AIDS Society, Sharon Lewin, said she hoped AIDS 2022 would lead to a more equitable global response to monkeypox. “Having worked in the HIV field for so long, we want to make sure that some of the mistakes made in the early response to HIV will not be repeated in this situation.”

As of August 2, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has identified 6,326 cases of monkeypox in all but two states. Worldwide, there are now more than 25,300 cases, most of them in countries where monkeypox had not been reported before this outbreak.

While anyone can contract monkeypox through close physical contact, cases remain extremely concentrated among men who have sex with men three months into the outbreak, even though testing for others groups have increased.

“The epidemiology becomes clearer over time,” said Meg Doherty, MD, PhD, director of global programs on HIV, hepatitis and sexually transmitted infections for the World Health Organization (WHO).

According to the August 2 WHO situation report, 99% of monkeypox cases are in men, 98% of whom identify as men who have sex with men. Sexual activity was the most common route of transmission, reported in 92% of cases. Of the cases with known ages, only 25 were children 4 years of age or younger. Five cases in children have been reported in the United States, likely related to family transmission.

Before the current outbreak, experts believed that monkeypox was not easily transmitted from person to person. In central and western Africa, the number of cases has been low and stable for decades, often linked to contact with animals. In a 2003 outbreak in the United States, nearly 50 people were infected through contact with prairie dogs, but there were no confirmed cases of person-to-person transmission.

But sex networks provide a niche for the rapid spread of monkeypox – and it may not be a new phenomenon. Speaking via video at a monkeypox symposium on Monday, Dimie Ogoina, MBBS, from Niger Delta University in Nigeria, described the changing epidemiology in that country, where monkeypox monkey is endemic. As NPR recently reported, Ogoina was among the first to observe that during a 2017 outbreak in Nigeria, monkeypox cases shifted to young, urban males without traditional risk factors, suggesting the virus spread. spread through sexual contact.

Unanswered questions

Reporters posed many questions during the media roundtable, but Marina Klein, MD, of McGill University in Montreal, acknowledged that many still don’t have answers. It’s not known the exact mechanisms of transmission, whether the respiratory route is important, or whether people can transmit the virus before they develop symptoms. Additionally, there are few data showing how well the new vaccine Jynneos (also known as Imvanex or Imvamune) works or whether treatment with TPOXX (tecovirimat) reduces symptoms or decreases virus shedding, which which has implications for the period of isolation.

One area where more answers have been revealed is in symptoms, thanks to the efforts of frontline clinicians and patients who shared their stories. Chloe Orkin, MBChB, of Queen Mary University of London, and a large team of collaborators recently published an analysis of over 500 cases of monkeypox, revealing previously unreported symptoms, including anal lesions and simple sores that may resemble to common sexually transmitted infections. Orkin is spearheading an effort to get the WHO and CDC to update their monkeypox case definitions to reflect these new symptoms.

In this case series, of those with known HIV status, 41% were HIV-positive, most of them on effective antiretroviral therapy. Reassuringly, there was no difference in overall outcomes between HIV-positive and HIV-negative people, Orkin said.

However, people living with HIV have a weaker response to the first dose of the Jynneos vaccine, suggesting that they should be prioritized for second doses. One study (MVA-011) found that 67% of HIV-positive people and 83% of HIV-negative people had an adequate immune response four weeks after the first dose, rising to 96% and 98%, respectively, after the second dose. .

The uncertainty about the effectiveness of the vaccine is reflected in the different protocols from country to country. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) maintains that Jynneos is a two-dose vaccine and that people need both doses. Many cities and countries administer one dose initially, to partially protect as many people as possible right away, but there is confusion about if and when people will need to get the second dose.

“Nobody says anything about efficacy and nobody says anything about time to protection,” said Simon Collins of HIV i-Base. “You have people who stop their behavior and do everything they can to get shot in the arm, but most people don’t get any information. This could contribute to worsening the epidemic because people will come out thinking that they are protected.

Access to vaccines

Health officials, clinicians and advocates agree that the global supply of monkeypox vaccines is not keeping up with demand. Unlike AIDS and COVID-19, vaccines and treatments for monkeypox already existed when the new epidemic emerged because they were developed, produced and stockpiled in the event of bioterrorism involving smallpox, a related virus.

But critics say these tools have not been deployed effectively. While Montreal has enough doses to supply visitors – an offer that many gay and bi attendees have taken advantage of – other countries have limited supplies. Even as gay and bisexual men in American cities line up to receive rare doses, most countries, including African nations that have been battling monkeypox for decades, have no access at all. to the vaccine.

Demetre Daskalakis, MD, MPH, director of the CDC’s Division of HIV Prevention, said the mismatch of supply and demand in the United States will likely continue through the summer and into the future. ‘fall. On August 2, the White House announced that FEMA’s Robert Fenton had been named the new national monkeypox response coordinator, with Daskalakis as deputy coordinator.

As Daskalakis began to speak at the symposium, dozens of protesters, including many veteran AIDS activists, stormed the stage, demanding broader and fairer access to vaccines and treatments for smallpox from the monkey in the United States and around the world.

Although the United States has the lion’s share of the world’s supply of Jynneos, American advocates are particularly frustrated that some 800,000 finished doses have sat unused for weeks at a factory in Denmark awaiting a delayed FDA inspection. .

“We need to act now,” said James Krellenstein of PrEP4All, who has taken the lead in monkeypox advocacy. “We are in a worsening epidemic that could have been easily avoided.”

The campaigners’ list of demands includes “decisive leadership” from the WHO and the United Nations on global access to the monkeypox vaccine and treatment, including efforts to scale up production. Currently, only one facility in Denmark can produce the Jynneos vaccine, with a production capacity of less than 50 million doses per year. They called for an “immediate transfer of intellectual property, know-how and technology” to manufacturers around the world capable of making vaccines, treatments and diagnostics.

Campaigners also demanded that high-income countries live up to their pledge to be a “vaccine arsenal for the world”. Advocates are loath to see a repeat of the situation with COVID-19 vaccines, where low-risk people in some high-income countries may get their second booster while many high-risk people in low-income countries don’t. have not been vaccinated at all.

The protesters demanded that the global response to monkeypox prioritize vulnerable populations and communities and called for funding and support for those who need to self-isolate. But, they stressed, increasing funding for the monkeypox response must not come at the expense of ongoing efforts to fight HIV, tuberculosis, hepatitis C and sexually transmitted infections.

“We need to increase capacity rather than jeopardize the momentum we have to deal with the simultaneous pandemics of today and those to come,” said Emily Bass of PrEP4All.

Click here for more reports on AIDS 2022.

Click here for more information on monkeypox.


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As SCOTUS certifies decision to stay in Mexico, defenders watch closely https://animalrightscafe.com/as-scotus-certifies-decision-to-stay-in-mexico-defenders-watch-closely/ Mon, 01 Aug 2022 23:09:09 +0000 https://animalrightscafe.com/as-scotus-certifies-decision-to-stay-in-mexico-defenders-watch-closely/ The Supreme Court has issued a certified judgment of its decision allowing the Biden administration to overturn the Migrant Protection Protocols – the Trump-era program that forced tens of thousands of migrants to wait out US asylum hearings in Mexico. This is supposed to pave the way for the program to end as planned. Texas […]]]>

The Supreme Court has issued a certified judgment of its decision allowing the Biden administration to overturn the Migrant Protection Protocols – the Trump-era program that forced tens of thousands of migrants to wait out US asylum hearings in Mexico. This is supposed to pave the way for the program to end as planned.

Texas and other states sued to keep the MPP in place after Department of Homeland Security Secretary Alejandro Mayorkas issued a memo ending the policy last fall. The case went to the Supreme Court after the 5th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals sided with Texas, and on June 30 the High Court ruled the government had the power to strike down the program as planned last fall.

But more than a month later, some supporters are wondering why the Biden administration has remained silent on its intention to cancel it. As The Wall Street Journal reported last week, some members of the Biden administration have expressed concern about whether ending the policy will lead to more people coming to the border.

Aaron Reichlin-Melnick, policy director at the US Immigration Council, which advocates for immigrants, says the MPP under Biden has been drastically reduced, in part because the Mexican government has imposed broader restrictions on who his country accepts through the MPP, and he should be well on his way to finishing.

“Realistically ending a program that is only associated with less than 1% of people coming to the border will not have a major impact on the number of people coming to the US-Mexico border,” said he declared.

But for migrants stuck in the program, Reichlin-Melnick says the pushback could be a matter of life and death. Then, the Fifth Circuit is expected to formally enact the Supreme Court’s decision in the coming weeks. Reichlin-Melnick says that should pave the way for the end of the MPP soon after, and his group will be watching closely to see what it does.

“The October 2021 memo signed by Secretary Mayorkas indicates that as soon as possible after this lower court order ends, the program will be halted again, which does not leave much room for the Biden administration to operate. “, did he declare.

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NYC Mayor Adams joins homeless advocates on a ‘slumber’ in Morningside Park https://animalrightscafe.com/nyc-mayor-adams-joins-homeless-advocates-on-a-slumber-in-morningside-park/ Sun, 31 Jul 2022 06:31:00 +0000 https://animalrightscafe.com/nyc-mayor-adams-joins-homeless-advocates-on-a-slumber-in-morningside-park/ Mayor Eric Adams sat on a park bench alongside homeless advocates during a ‘slumber’ in Manhattan’s Morningside Park on Saturday night amid a wide-spread homelessness crisis from the city. The mayor joined homeless lawyer Shams DaBaron, also known as the Homeless Hero, on the bench where DaBaron had slept regularly while homeless. DaBaron organized Sleep […]]]>

Mayor Eric Adams sat on a park bench alongside homeless advocates during a ‘slumber’ in Manhattan’s Morningside Park on Saturday night amid a wide-spread homelessness crisis from the city.

The mayor joined homeless lawyer Shams DaBaron, also known as the Homeless Hero, on the bench where DaBaron had slept regularly while homeless.

DaBaron organized Sleep Out Homeless Rights Month to show “solidarity with those who have to spend the night on these benches, those who have to sleep in encampments, those who have to sleep on trains, those who are in these shelters. We are trying to make sure that is not our reality,” he said.

New York City Public Advocate Jumaane Williams — along with her baby daughter — and Human Resources and Human Services Commissioner Gary P. Jenkins also joined the couple on the bench.

About a dozen other defenders were in the crowd, some with lawn chairs ready to spend the night.

Mayor Adams is committed to helping solve New York’s growing homelessness problem.
Christopher Sadowski

“I come to this bench almost every week,” said DaBaron, who said his “greatest fear” at this point in his life was “to die on this bench.”

“We’re here in real time saying we’re not going to let decades, centuries…of failed policies keep us in this condition,” he continued. “We don’t build slums. We don’t do camps. We don’t ride the subway. We don’t do that.

He said Adams inherited the problem but pledged to hold him accountable.

As the homeless hero eulogized the mayor, a woman in the crowd shouted, “We don’t want Safe Haven!” We want permanent housing!

“I can’t find accommodation. There is no way to enter these accommodations,” added the woman, who lives in a shelter. She was then escorted out.

Another woman, East Harlem mother Kimberly Tire, ripped the mayor over school budget cuts.

New York City Mayor Eric Adams emerges as advocates for homelessness awareness.
Mayor Adams spent the night talking with homeless awareness advocates to find solutions to New York’s homeless problem.
Christopher Sadowski

“If our black and brown students are out of school, where do you think they will be? They will be homeless and they will turn to guns. The cycle goes on and on and on,’ she said as the mayor sat on the bench in silence.

“The only thing I’m not afraid of is being among the people because I am the people. I’m used to all the energy that comes from everyone…all day, every day,” Adams said, briefly noting after the crowd criticism.

“I came here for a reason, to support Shams. Period. End of statement,” the mayor told the gathered press.

Adams said earlier this month that the city’s homeless shelters were overrun with migrant asylum seekers, with nearly 3,000 arriving in recent weeks.

The mayor pleaded with President Joe Biden to send “additional federal resources immediately” so the city can handle the overflow.

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Legalizing the Journey: A Mushroom Defender’s Playbook https://animalrightscafe.com/legalizing-the-journey-a-mushroom-defenders-playbook/ Fri, 29 Jul 2022 09:08:08 +0000 https://animalrightscafe.com/legalizing-the-journey-a-mushroom-defenders-playbook/ And a lot of people here are taking advantage of DC’s unique decriminalization rules. Microdosing mushrooms as a kind of performance-enhancing brain stimulation — already hugely popular among California techies — is now quite common in Washington, especially in media circles. Recreational use – macrodosing? – is not so rare either. If you want a […]]]>

And a lot of people here are taking advantage of DC’s unique decriminalization rules. Microdosing mushrooms as a kind of performance-enhancing brain stimulation — already hugely popular among California techies — is now quite common in Washington, especially in media circles. Recreational use – macrodosing? – is not so rare either. If you want a completely legal psychedelic experience, you can stop by Field Trip on 15th Street NW, where licensed therapists treat PTSD, depression, and other mental health issues with psychedelic-assisted therapy using ketamine.

Much of the new curiosity about psychedelics has been sparked by Michael Pollan’s 2018 book, “How to Change Your Mind: What the New Science of Psychedelics Teaches Us About Consciousness, Death, Addiction, depression and transcendence”. (The book has now been turned into a show on Netflix.) In other circles, Joe Rogan’s mushroom podcasts have sparked an outpouring of interest.

The Department of Veterans Affairs is currently conducting clinical trials with psilocybin, the drug found in psychedelic mushrooms, to treat mental health issues. And The Intercept reported this week that in a recent letter to Rep. Madeleine Dean (D-Pa.), the Biden administration revealed that the FDA is likely to approve the use of psilocybin to treat depression during of the next two years.

But cities and states are one step ahead of the federal government. There are movements in over two dozen states to study, decriminalize, or outright legalize mushrooms and other psychedelics. With many veterans as the face of the movement, it’s happening in blue states like California, New York, and Vermont, as well as red states like Utah, Kansas, and Florida.

The epicenter of this movement, as was the case with the legalization of cannabis, is Colorado, where voters will decide in November whether to approve the Natural Medicine Health Act of 2022, which would create regulated “healing centers” by the state where anyone over the age of 21 could receive psilocybin-assisted therapy.

It’s safe to say that we’re on the cusp of a new frontier in drug legalization, and within the next few years psychedelics will be as readily available in cities and states across the country as they are now in DC. And most politicians are heaven. I haven’t even begun to think about what their position should be on this issue.

On this week’s episode of Playbook Deep Dive, Ryan traveled to Littlejohn, Colorado and sat down with Veronica Lightning Horse Perez, the Colorado Mushroom Campaign Co-Head. They talked about how psychedelics helped her deal with her mental health issues, what it’s like to undergo psychedelic therapy with mushrooms and ayahuasca, and her own journey to becoming the unlikely political activist at the forefront of mushroom legalization.

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Advocates push Minneapolis to provide money to support abortion access https://animalrightscafe.com/advocates-push-minneapolis-to-provide-money-to-support-abortion-access/ Tue, 26 Jul 2022 09:00:00 +0000 https://animalrightscafe.com/advocates-push-minneapolis-to-provide-money-to-support-abortion-access/ Abortion fund Our Justice, along with Pro-Choice Minnesota and Minneapolis City Council members Aisha Chughtai and Robin Wonsley, have launched a campaign to get the city to provide direct funding for access to abortion. When the United States Supreme Court overturned Roe v. Wade in June, ending nationwide constitutional protections for abortion, Minnesota became an […]]]>

Abortion fund Our Justice, along with Pro-Choice Minnesota and Minneapolis City Council members Aisha Chughtai and Robin Wonsley, have launched a campaign to get the city to provide direct funding for access to abortion.

When the United States Supreme Court overturned Roe v. Wade in June, ending nationwide constitutional protections for abortion, Minnesota became an island among surrounding states with restrictive abortion laws and limited services. Providers and advocates say they are already seeing an increase in the need for support and services.

“We’re already at double the demands we were at this time last year,” said Megumi Rierson, director of communications at abortion fund Our Justice.

“We’re seeing a lot more patients coming specifically from Texas, which will probably mean the claims will be a bit more expensive,” they continued, “Because it’s not just going to be funding abortion, it’s will also act for us to get a hotel room for people.And also referring to travel assistance.

Those travel costs, especially right now with inflation, can be significant.

With several states limiting access to abortion, patients are now forced to request appointments in remote locations, often on short notice. That means booking a last-minute flight, which can cost hundreds – or thousands – of dollars, or potentially travel hundreds of miles. And that doesn’t include other costs, like several hotel nights, local transportation, childcare costs, potentially lost wages, and the cost of the procedure itself.

This is what has led these groups to follow in the footsteps of other cities like Portland, Chicago and New York, which have all allocated money to abortion funds as part of their city budgets.

Rierson said they were asking the city to create a general line item in the budget for $800,000 that would go to the fund. It would be run by the city’s health department and available through an open request for proposals process to “any group that operates in Minneapolis to provide abortion care funding, abortion funding, support practical and assistance with travel and accommodation”.

So far, several members of the Minneapolis City Council have said they would support the fund. Others either didn’t respond or said they didn’t have time to review the proposal.

In an interview with MPR News, Mayor Frey said that since the release of the leaked draft Dobbs notice in early May, he has spoken with Planned Parenthood officials – and now Hennepin County stakeholders – to see how the city can best use its resources to support people seeking abortions.

As for creating an abortion fund, Frey said no idea was “currently on the table.”

“I love the proposal, in that we want to have a fund available for people who have access to it, or who need it, to be able to travel to our city, to travel to our state, to have safe abortions because we view our state as a safe haven,” the mayor said. “Exactly how is this funded and where does it come from is part of the work that needs to be done now to move forward. before. And also where our city’s resources are best used. »

Some proponents say this model, of having established organizations request funding and then distributing it to people in their networks, is the best way for cities to ensure financial support gets to the right place quickly.

“When a city is considering funding an initiative, it’s often more effective to launch that program by funding work already underway in the community. And it’s a way for public funds to immediately connect to important work that’s already underway,” said Neesha Davé, deputy director of the Texas-based Lilith Fund.

She previously worked in an Austin City Council office when the budget amendment passed in 2019 to create a fund to help pay for costs associated with abortions, such as childcare, accommodations and travel. .

“Abortion access organizations, like abortion funds and practice support organizations, have a wealth of expertise in helping people access abortion care and filling the gaps where governments have failed. “Dave said.

Rierson said they are currently working to garner public support for this campaign. As of July 21, they had about 3,000 signatures on an online petition. They plan to deliver the signatures to the mayor in mid-August, before he submits his draft budget.

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Abortion Advocates Protest Indiana’s Proposed Ban Ahead of Special Session https://animalrightscafe.com/abortion-advocates-protest-indianas-proposed-ban-ahead-of-special-session/ Mon, 25 Jul 2022 01:09:39 +0000 https://animalrightscafe.com/abortion-advocates-protest-indianas-proposed-ban-ahead-of-special-session/ HIGHLAND, Ind. – Attendees at the rally in Indiana demonstrated against the state’s proposed restrictions on abortion on the eve of a special session that will bring lawmakers together to debate the issue. Held at Wicker Park in Highland, Indiana, rallies protested a state law that could lay bare a potential ban on most abortions. […]]]>

HIGHLAND, Ind. – Attendees at the rally in Indiana demonstrated against the state’s proposed restrictions on abortion on the eve of a special session that will bring lawmakers together to debate the issue.

Held at Wicker Park in Highland, Indiana, rallies protested a state law that could lay bare a potential ban on most abortions. Noah Thomas and Katelin Sears are the protest organizers.

“I unfortunately think they’re going to pass this terrible law,” Thomas said.

Sears added: “This is the generation where we speak and this is the generation where I hope we can cheer.”

On Monday morning, when the Indiana Legislature returns to the Statehouse for a special session, lawmakers will consider a Republican-proposed bill that would ban most abortions, with promises to increase spending to help pregnant women , young children and adoptions.

“What I would like to see is for abortion to be legal. It shouldn’t be taken away,” Sears said. “It’s a right that every woman should be able to have.”

The bill that falls on the heels of the Supreme Court overturning Roe v Wade, which would ban all abortions unless the pregnancy caused a “permanent substantial impairment” of the mother or resulted from rape or an incest.

“Millions of people have had their reproductive rights taken away by the Supreme Court, which is simply unacceptable,” Thomas said.

Ultimately, Thomas says he thinks the bill will pass but says he’ll be protesting non-stop in the hope that Vice President Kamala Harris’ visit with Indiana lawmakers on Monday will make a difference. .

“I would really like her to change some of the minds of our Republican legislators,” Thomas said. “I think tomorrow she can.”

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Lawyers concerned about Alabama’s telemedicine law https://animalrightscafe.com/lawyers-concerned-about-alabamas-telemedicine-law/ Thu, 21 Jul 2022 01:30:00 +0000 https://animalrightscafe.com/lawyers-concerned-about-alabamas-telemedicine-law/ MONTGOMERY, Ala. (WSFA) – Concerns have grown over the regulations included in Alabama’s new telemedicine law. The recently enacted law requires patients to see a doctor in person before being prescribed a controlled substance in a virtual setting. The law was put in place to prevent telemedicine fraud, but a healthcare company says it negatively […]]]>

MONTGOMERY, Ala. (WSFA) – Concerns have grown over the regulations included in Alabama’s new telemedicine law. The recently enacted law requires patients to see a doctor in person before being prescribed a controlled substance in a virtual setting.

The law was put in place to prevent telemedicine fraud, but a healthcare company says it negatively impacts people with opioid use disorders.

Dr. Brian Clear of Bicycle Health says controlled substance treatment is the best way to treat opioid addiction.

“We know very well that telemedicine is an effective way to deliver that care,” Clear said.

He added that in-person treatment can be daunting for someone with opioid use disorder, and only 40% of counties nationwide have these providers licensed.

“Most counties don’t even have anyone, requiring long journeys to get treatment,” Clear said.

That’s why Bicycle Health launched Alabama Airdrop.

“The gratitude of the patients that we have come here to help them maintain their treatment has been really deep and profound,” said Dr. Amelia Burgess, program physician.

Burgess and other doctors from Bicycle Health flew to Alabama to meet patients in person, but they couldn’t reach everyone and stopped taking new patients to Alabama.

“In an ideal world, this law would look like a law that does not place arbitrary restrictions on the use of drugs that work through telemedicine,” Clear said.

However, there are other treatment options for people with opioid use disorder.

Mark Litvine is founder and marketing director of ROSS Recovery Center, an addiction support center.

“Six months ago we were getting 800 to 1,000 calls a month statewide in Alabama,” Litvine said. “That number has grown tremendously.”

The center has locations across the state and offers help for people with all substance use disorders.

“If someone dies, they have no chance of recovering,” Litvine said. “And we try to keep people alive.”

Litvine also says the center plans to implement a new medication-assisted recovery program late next month.

If you or someone you know has a substance use disorder, they can call the ROSS Recovery Center 24/7 hotline at 844-307-1760.

Copyright 2022 WSFA 12 News. All rights reserved.

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