Animal Rescue – Animal Rights Cafe http://animalrightscafe.com/ Sun, 02 Oct 2022 09:05:38 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://animalrightscafe.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-6-150x150.png Animal Rescue – Animal Rights Cafe http://animalrightscafe.com/ 32 32 Philadelphia animal activists focus on ‘both ends of the leash’ to increase diversity and inclusion https://animalrightscafe.com/philadelphia-animal-activists-focus-on-both-ends-of-the-leash-to-increase-diversity-and-inclusion/ Sun, 02 Oct 2022 09:05:38 +0000 https://animalrightscafe.com/philadelphia-animal-activists-focus-on-both-ends-of-the-leash-to-increase-diversity-and-inclusion/ Carina Cheatham hasn’t met many people in the animal welfare field like her, but that has never stopped her from helping a creature in need. This is where Ava comes in. Last December, Cheatham’s social media lit up for days about a stray dog ​​walking up and down Cottman Avenue. So, with a winter storm […]]]>

Carina Cheatham hasn’t met many people in the animal welfare field like her, but that has never stopped her from helping a creature in need. This is where Ava comes in.

Last December, Cheatham’s social media lit up for days about a stray dog ​​walking up and down Cottman Avenue. So, with a winter storm brewing, she and her 9-year-old daughter Arianna hit the road. They found the frightened pup, got her in their car and brought her to the PSPCA. Soon after, the dog they called Ava was adopted.

“It felt good,” said Cheatham, who was so inspired she created her rescue, The Black Thornberry, named after a Nickelodeon cartoon character who talks to animals. Since then, Cheatham, better known as Nina Love on social media and in rescue circles, has found foster homes for stray animals, helped fund veterinary care and provided free food for pets to owners in need.

“I want to use my platform so other people can see it’s possible,” said Cheatham, 31, a vet tech. “I feel like as a black woman, they need to see that they can do it too.”

Across the country, animal welfare leaders say their movement needs more voices like Cheatham. They are calling for greater diversity within their own ranks, as well as more programs that support a more racially, culturally and economically inclusive view of pet ownership.

“The fact that 70% of Americans have pets shows how much this country loves animals and considers them part of the family,” said Julie Castle, CEO of Best Friends Animal Society, America’s largest organization. unkilled animals in the world. “There’s a lot of diversity in that 70%, and we should represent the communities we serve.”

In recent years, two of the nation’s leading pet charities have made diversity, equity and inclusion a fundraising priority, just as other institutions have focused on greater social justice. .

Last year, Maddie’s Fund, one of the charities, handed out $1 million in grants to help animal organizations run by people of color – and The Black Thornberry was one of them.

PetSmart Charities has injected $15 million into its ongoing campaign to make veterinary care accessible to the roughly 50% of pet owners who struggle to afford it. In Philadelphia, that campaign included partnering with Emancipet, a nonprofit animal care organization, to open a new low-cost veterinary service and spay/neuter clinic last July at the PetSmart store on Roosevelt Boulevard.

“We don’t believe that socio-economic barriers should prevent anyone from enjoying the company of a pet,” said Kate Atema, director of grants and community initiatives for PetSmart Charities.

CARE (Companions and Animals for Reform and Equity), a national advocacy group whose mission is to increase diversity and inclusion in animal welfare, is hosting its first conference in Philadelphia October 6-8. He will publish new research he commissioned that affirms the close relationships people of color have with their pets.

“Different cultures may celebrate the human and animal bond in unique ways, but this study proves once again that ‘love is love,'” said CARE co-founder James Evans. “BIPOC (Black, Indigenous, People of Color) Americans are connected to their four-legged family in the deepest way.”

CARE is advocating for more BIPOC leaders in animal welfare, an area that CARE and many other members of the movement say has long been predominantly white. The reasons are many, but Evans said they include people of color who aren’t wanted or intentionally or unwelcome by predominantly white institutions. Additionally, Evans said, because people of color in America disproportionately face economic challenges, they may not have the time to devote to animal welfare, which relies heavily on volunteerism. . And with fewer BIPOC people involved, he said, they are less likely to become leadership candidates.

According to CARE, increased BIPOC leadership on animal welfare could lead to more culturally sensitive programs, including adoption policies that could reduce the number of animals in shelters.

“We all have prejudices. It’s part of the human experience,” Evans said. “We’re asking people to examine these biases against real data and real information.”

Leslie Miller is a retired Baltimore City police officer who CARE helped defend last winter.

Miller, 69, an experienced pet owner who is black, had filed 18 applications at various shelters and shelters to adopt a dog. Not all responded or rejected it.

Miller said a Great Dane rescue told her she didn’t have enough money to keep a Great Dane – even though her last two dogs were Great Danes and she had a steady income, not to mention of a fenced yard.

CARE reached out to their network and put Miller in touch with The Animal Adoption Center in Lindenwold, who had a Great Dane who needed a home.

Soon, a tearfully elated Miller took Rudy, a tanned Dane, to his home in Baltimore.

Evans said he believed Miller had been discriminated against because of his downtown Baltimore zip code and his age.

“It was a nightmare and it was very humiliating,” Miller said of the rejections.

In a city as diverse as Philadelphia, some of the major animal welfare organizations have expanded their programs to keep existing families between humans and animals intact.

“When we all started, it was very animal-focused,” said Melissa Levy, executive director of PAWS. “Now it’s a lot about both ends of the leash.”

The PAWS adoption process is an initial application and then a conversation between the person who wants to adopt and a PAWS adoption counselor to help achieve a successful animal-person match, not to eliminate people based on factors such as income, according to Levy.

This conversation can include a discussion of the supports the new owner might need.

PAWS and their colleagues at the PSPCA have increased their low-cost, free veterinary services and have community outreach programs that offer a multitude of services to all pet owners. This has included partnerships with other community groups to distribute pet food and other resources. PAWS recently launched a temporary foster program to foster short-term animals whose owners, due to housing or other issues, may otherwise have to give up their pets. The agency is looking for more host families so it can expand the program.

PAWS helped Charlotte Winslow, 71, of South Philadelphia, remove a large growth from one of the paws of Obie, a poodle mix that had belonged to her late husband. Winslow said she couldn’t afford the $1,300 a private vet wanted to charge her, but she couldn’t imagine life without Obie.

“It’s my company. I say there are two people here: Jesus, me and the dog,” she said. “As long as I live and God gives me breath in my body, I will take care of this dog.”

Adell Johnson, 41, a home health aide from South Philly, said PAWS provided her with three months of dog food when her working hours were significantly reduced during the pandemic.

“It was absolutely amazing. I couldn’t ask for anything more during these difficult times,” she said. “My dogs mean as much to me as my children.”

Animals have meant a lot to Cheatham since she was a little girl, when her mother, a science teacher, taught small creatures and her pet rabbit Fluffy was her escape from bullying at school and other places. problems.

His favorite cartoon was The Wild Thornberrys, about a family who travels the world in an RV to make wildlife movies and their daughter Eliza who could talk to animals.

Now that she’s launched her nonprofit, The Black Thornberry, Cheatham has been trying to raise money to buy a van for her animal rescue work in the Philadelphia area.

A few months ago, Cheatham appeared on the Ellen Show to talk about her rescue and the need for diversity in animal welfare. She received $10,000 to help her with her work. In addition to support from Maddie’s Fund, she has also secured other grants. She also does her own fundraising to pay for things like her pet food deliveries and animal health needs.

She hopes hearing about The Black Thornberry will inspire others to take action.

“The next day they see an injured animal, maybe they’ll think back and say, ‘She did that the other day. Let me see if I can help,” she said. “I want people to understand that they can do it too.”

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Washougal woman plants native pollinator garden outside local animal sanctuary https://animalrightscafe.com/washougal-woman-plants-native-pollinator-garden-outside-local-animal-sanctuary/ Thu, 29 Sep 2022 18:10:22 +0000 https://animalrightscafe.com/washougal-woman-plants-native-pollinator-garden-outside-local-animal-sanctuary/ When Margaret Gossage moved from Phoenix to Portland in 2013, she planted a native pollinator garden in her home that eventually earned certified status from the Backyard Habitat program, a Portland-based nonprofit that provides technical assistance, financial incentives, encouragement and recognition for people who want to create low-maintenance natural gardens. But when Gossage was unable […]]]>

When Margaret Gossage moved from Phoenix to Portland in 2013, she planted a native pollinator garden in her home that eventually earned certified status from the Backyard Habitat program, a Portland-based nonprofit that provides technical assistance, financial incentives, encouragement and recognition for people who want to create low-maintenance natural gardens.

But when Gossage was unable to replicate the feat when she moved to Washougal several years ago, due to the size of her garden, she had to get creative.

In the spring of 2021, she planted a native pollinator garden at the West Columbia Gorge Humane Society, which recently received silver certification from the environmental group.

“It’s just something I wanted to do, and I’m glad I accomplished it,” said Gossage, who has volunteered with WCGHS for the past five years. “I think it made our small team of volunteers aware of backyard habitats and the importance of native plants to the environment. I’m happy to be the evangelist for that in any way I can.

Bethany Wray, program coordinator for the Watershed Alliance of Southwest Washington, a nonprofit that works with the Habitat Program to certify Clark County yards, said the garden in front of the WCGHS animal shelter is “the first public place in Washougal to be certified,” according to Gossage.

“It’s a small area with full sun and lots of radiant heat from the sidewalk and the brick building, so it’s great to see it so well,” according to a post on the program’s Facebook page. “Margaret (did) a great job coordinating this community project in Washougal.”

The program has certified more than 5,000 properties since its launch in 2009, according to the Portland Audubon website.

“When I moved from Phoenix to Portland, I was just in heaven because nothing was growing in Phoenix, and I was able to grow everything in my backyard in Portland,” Gossage said. “I just thought (native gardening) sounded interesting, and that’s how I started learning about the importance of native plants in the habitat. And since I couldn’t do it at (my Washougal’s), I thought, ‘Well, let’s do it here.’ I just thought a human society and a backyard habitat would be a good match.

Three-quarters of the world’s flowering plants and about 35% of the world’s food crops depend on animal pollinators to reproduce, according to the United States Department of Agriculture website, which also indicates that some scientists estimate that a bite out of three of food. eat exist because of animal pollinators like bees, butterflies, moths, birds, bats, beetles and other insects.

“It’s important to grow native plants wherever you live in the world because bees, birds, and (other) animals need them,” Gossage said. “The more native flora and fauna you have in your garden, the better it is for the environment. There’s a sign there now (that says the shelter is) certified backyard habitat and educates people and makes them say, ‘Oh, what is that? That’s curious. I’ll look that up,’ and maybe help let other people in the community know about it. I wanted ( also) something that would look good and (that) people would find attractive when they came to the dog shelter, rather than just a dirt pot with weeds in it.

Gossage enlisted Hannah Schrager, operator of Good Year Farms, a Washougal nursery specializing in native plants, to create the garden.

“Hannah actually designed the layout of the garden (and figured out) which plants would work best there,” Gossage said. “She donated some of the plants and gave me a discount on other plants. Then I asked other volunteers to come and help me plant, and three other volunteers helped me plant one day. It didn’t take very long because there wasn’t much in there to start with – just some weeds.

Gossage planted a variety of native species including yarrow, cutleaf penstemon, pearly everlasting, meadow checkerspot, nodding onion, hairy manzanita, and kinnikinnik.

“We were looking for plants that would bloom at different times of the season – early summer, mid-summer, late summer,” she said. “We were also looking for plants that would be green all winter so that we had plants that would still look good when the plants weren’t flowering. Sometimes it just looks fried so we have to keep it basted. When the rains return this fall, we will see a resurgence of certain plants. Then in the spring it will look great.

“And as I see other plants that don’t survive, or holes that need to be filled, I have some extra plants that I’m growing in my yard that I’m just going to transplant into the garden, and hopefully, eventually , it will look like a big chaotic and charming mess.

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Animal Abuse Suspects on the Run, Josephine County Sheriff’s Office Investigates More Evidence | Top Stories https://animalrightscafe.com/animal-abuse-suspects-on-the-run-josephine-county-sheriffs-office-investigates-more-evidence-top-stories/ Wed, 28 Sep 2022 02:04:00 +0000 https://animalrightscafe.com/animal-abuse-suspects-on-the-run-josephine-county-sheriffs-office-investigates-more-evidence-top-stories/ SELMA, Ore. — The Josephine County Sheriff’s Office is still investigating the owners of Pawsitive K9 Solutions, who have been charged with animal abuse. On Monday, JCSO searched the owners’ residence in Selma and found more visible evidence of animal abuse. JCSO searched the property – located in the 100 block of Turnagain Drive – […]]]>

SELMA, Ore. — The Josephine County Sheriff’s Office is still investigating the owners of Pawsitive K9 Solutions, who have been charged with animal abuse. On Monday, JCSO searched the owners’ residence in Selma and found more visible evidence of animal abuse.

JCSO searched the property – located in the 100 block of Turnagain Drive – on Monday afternoon. 16 animals were found in various stages of malnutrition and two animals, including a horse and a rabbit, were found dead. JCSO also found an illegal marijuana grow operation on the property with hundreds of pounds of processed marijuana.

The owners of Pawsitive K9 Solutions and the Selma property are said to be on the run. Sheriff Dave Daniel says the investigation is still ongoing but is confident the suspects will be brought to justice.

“My message to them is, ‘You can run but you can’t hide. And we’re coming,’ Daniel said.

Anyone with information on the whereabouts of the suspects is urged to call the Josephine County Sheriff’s Office.

The 16 surviving animals from the Selma property included a horse, several dogs, cats and chickens. The dogs and cats were taken to the Josephine County Animal Shelter. The horse was subcontracted to a horse rescue center. Two additional horses were also on the property and were picked up by a citizen.

Daniel says these kinds of cases are hard to watch, but he’s happy that with the help of the community and a quick response from law enforcement, they were able to save so many animals.

“Veterinary services have always been there and everyone has really worked together, including our community and our citizens,” Daniel said. “It’s kind of a heartbreaking situation, but it’s a successful operation when you can save so many.”

On Wednesday, September 21, JCSO rescued 13 dogs from Pawsitive K9 Solutions. The 13 dogs were found in cages without food or water and were in various stages of malnutrition. The dogs were taken to the Josephine County Animal Shelter and received medical attention from Pacific Veterinary Services. As of Monday, the shelter says all 13 dogs have started gaining weight.

Megan Blakley signed up her dog, Marshal, for a 6-week boarding and training session with Pawsitive K9 Solutions on August 27. Blakely wrote in an email that she was able to pick up Marshal from the shelter on Monday and that he was by her side. from.

“I was thrilled to have him home and relieved that he was healthy enough to go home,” Blakey wrote. “I still feel like the worst mother dog ever because I didn’t realize what was going on and I never saw any signs that this abuse might be happening.”

Blakely says she made sure to do her research on onboarding and training before choosing Pawsitive K9 Solutions.

“Everything felt legit: positive reviews, clean facilities, and plenty of photos and videos,” she wrote.

It wasn’t until three weeks into Marshal’s training that Blakely started noticing some issues. She says the owners stopped communicating with her and became unreachable.

Josephine County said Tuesday that all 13 dog owners have been identified. However, some dogs are still at the shelter. The Josephine County Animal Shelter says that while they are happy to help care for animals in need, they have been more than full for years.

The shelter is currently accepting donations and help from volunteers. To donate, visit their website.

Follow @KDRV12 on Facebook and @KDRV on Twitter for the latest news, sports and weather in Southern Oregon and Northern California.

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Great Dane rescued after spending month lost on Michigan island https://animalrightscafe.com/great-dane-rescued-after-spending-month-lost-on-michigan-island/ Fri, 23 Sep 2022 21:10:36 +0000 https://animalrightscafe.com/great-dane-rescued-after-spending-month-lost-on-michigan-island/ More than a month after rescue efforts began, a dog has been captured and removed from an island in County Clare and is “doing fine”, according to a Clare County Animal Shelter volunteer. Animal control staff and local volunteers have been working to rescue the dog, a brown and white Great Dane named Zaria, from […]]]>

More than a month after rescue efforts began, a dog has been captured and removed from an island in County Clare and is “doing fine”, according to a Clare County Animal Shelter volunteer.

Animal control staff and local volunteers have been working to rescue the dog, a brown and white Great Dane named Zaria, from the island since she went missing on the night of August 17 from her home in Harrison, a small city ​​in the center of Michigan’s Lower Peninsula.

Zaria, 2, walked into a trap set by Clare County Animal Control on Wednesday, allowing rescuers to bring her safely back to the shelter for medical treatment, according to a Facebook post from the shelter. Her safe return closes the book with a story that caught the attention of dog lovers on social media platforms.

“We will update everyone on Zaria’s progress over time,” read the post, which garnered nearly 3,000 reactions. “She was examined by Dr B at Surrey Vet, and she was allowed to begin her slow recovery process. She will be given several small meals a day until her system can adjust. She has been sleeping since her arrival.

Shelter staff thank those who helped, including Steve’s Market, who donated chicken, residents who donated money and food, and an ‘unnamed downstate friend’ who donated new age equipment donation for rescue.

The island’s swampy conditions made some conventional rescue techniques less effective, according to Moore’s Lost K9 Search & Recovery, which helped with the effort, on Facebook. Officials previously said Zaria likely made it to the island after slipping off her pass, running away and swimming across a channel.

“We will continue to assess her, make sure she is gaining weight, take her back to the vet, it will take about a week just to recheck,” Ruanne Hicks, County Clare animal control director, told 9&10 News. “She’s not very confident but she’s extremely nice. She never offered to growl, she never offered a bite, nothing.

Hicks told Newsweek that Zaria’s owner released her to the shelter, where “after she returns to normal health, she will be placed in a foster home” or with a rescue service.

Updates on Zaria will be provided on the shelter’s Facebook page.

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Pet Rescue Without Borders: 15 Years of Successful SPCA Puerto Vallarta https://animalrightscafe.com/pet-rescue-without-borders-15-years-of-successful-spca-puerto-vallarta/ Wed, 21 Sep 2022 20:31:55 +0000 https://animalrightscafe.com/pet-rescue-without-borders-15-years-of-successful-spca-puerto-vallarta/ The SPCA Puerto Vallarta (Society for the Protection and Compassion of Animals) was founded in 2007. This non-profit organization helps rescue animals from the streets or in situations of abandonment and promotes sterilization campaigns, in addition to facilitate the adoption of pets in our bay and to other countries. The first location of this shelter […]]]>

The SPCA Puerto Vallarta (Society for the Protection and Compassion of Animals) was founded in 2007. This non-profit organization helps rescue animals from the streets or in situations of abandonment and promotes sterilization campaigns, in addition to facilitate the adoption of pets in our bay and to other countries.

The first location of this shelter or sanctuary (as it is also called) was in a small two-bedroom house in the Paso Ancho neighborhood, which was conditioned to receive, care for and rehabilitate dogs and cats that were removed from streets. He has provided many rescued animals with a safe haven.

Over time, and as the need arose, the SPCA Puerto Vallarta began looking for a larger space that would allow them to help more animals and better care for the animals they have. saved. So, in 2012, they moved to their current location, which is located next to the banks of the Pitillal River.

One of the main goals of this group of workers is to reduce the number of homeless dogs and cats in our destination. This objective has led the organization to work closely with foreign associations such as PVCA Animal Rescue (Canada) and PreVent Cruelty to Animals (United States). Its purpose is to facilitate the adoption of local animals and their transfer to these countries. To do this, they must have the animals examined and have full health documents (so they are medically cleared to travel).

Pet Relocation Program

Luz María Wong, director of SPCA Puerto Vallarta, shares general details of this program which has rescued and relocated an average of 200 dogs and cats per year.

“Upon arrival at the shelter, the animals go directly to a quarantine area. They stay here and receive a protocol that includes blood tests and a series of tests to detect different diseases. Then, if they test positive for a disease, the corresponding treatment is given to the animal. Once our vets have verified that they are in perfect health, we have them photographed and then upload the photos and any related information to a website where the animals are posted for adoption,” she explains.

SPCA Puerto Vallarta

“When an adopter shows interest in a certain dog or cat, he receives an application to fill out. If the application is sufficient, a representative of one of the associations with which we collaborate abroad visits the house where the “animal will live and examine it in detail to make sure it meets the necessary conditions. This way they know who the owners will be and, if everything is in order, they proceed to adopt the animal” , she adds.

“At this point, what we call flying angels come on stage. That is to say that our network of collaborators and friends in person and on social networks begins to ask among their acquaintances if anyone is going to travel soon to the United States or Canada who could take the animal and deliver it directly to the adopter. We carry out the procedure and we cover all the expenses, which are mainly covered by the cooperation fee,” she explains.

Adoptions are also made locally and the application process is much the same: “Family members who have decision-making power are invited to complete an application where they express their mutual agreement to integrate a pet into the home. After reviewing the request, we make a visit to the home to ensure that the spaces are adequate to accommodate the animal. If they meet these conditions, cooperation costs which include sterilization surgery, certain vaccines and other related expenses are covered.

Dusty: The Puerto Vallarta SPCA Case Study

Wong pieced together the story of Dusty, an abandoned dog who was very ill when rescued, who has since been adopted and lives overseas with a Canadian family.

“Dusty was very skinny and suffered from just about every disease a dog can get. It was found in the Mojoneras neighborhood in 2019, in an area with a lot of dust, hence its name. His physical condition was so depressing that he blended in with the surrounding land, and his illnesses were so severe that it was thought he would not survive. In fact, we didn’t know where to start the treatment. However, thanks to the work of the whole team, between the end of 2020 and the beginning of 2021, we were able to place him in Canada, and he remains strong and healthy today.

SPCA Puerto Vallarta

Challenges for the shelter

Hurricane Nora brought high winds and heavy rain with it when it made landfall at our destination in August 2021. Unfortunately, these extreme weather conditions caused massive river overflows, as well as flooding and landslides. devastating terrain in several parts of the city.

With the flooding of the Pitillal River and the trees that were swept away and swept away by its current, the facilities and infrastructure at the SPCA Puerto Vallarta shelter suffered severe damage. “More than half of our land is gone and approximately 6,500 square feet of the building structure has been lost. This included the 20 cages that made up the quarantine area, the swimming pool that served as a place to perform physical therapies and the cat area, as well as our dining room, a bathroom, the laundry room and an apartment where our collaborators lived. . Now we only have nine cages left, a bathroom, a veterinary practice which we have adapted into a storage area and the operating room,” explains Wong.

Although in the short term they are looking to gradually rebuild their facilities, one of their biggest challenges is working on strengthening the river banks, which require the erection of gabion walls to function as effective protection. against the possible presence of another meteorological phenomenon. phenomenon.

How to help?

Mainly, this partnership can be supported in three ways:

  • By getting involved as a volunteer.
  • With in-kind donations (while the cat food is Maintenance Cat, the dog food is Nature’s Domain, both Kirkland brand).
  • Through tax-deductible economic donations through the organization’s website at spcapv.com.

SPCA Puerto Vallarta

In Memory Of Janice Chatterton

Janice Chatterton, Founder and President of SPCA Puerto Vallarta, has done for a living what few people do because she has helped change social behaviors and saved the lives of countless animals. She passed away in 2019 after suffering from a sudden illness.

Originally from California, Chatterton, an entrepreneur, came to our destination in 1990, when she bought the iconic Casa Bur-Sus to use as a vacation property – the home that Richard Burton gave to Susan Burton after the filming. The night of the iguana. She undertook renovations and the purchase of the surrounding villas. Eventually this property became Casa San Ángel and finally, in 2003, Hacienda San Ángel, which it remains today.

At the same time, she developed the Sociedad Protectora y Compasiva por los Animales (Society of Protection and Compassion for Animals) of Puerto Vallarta, a project carried out with great success in our destination for 15 years.

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Grandmother dies after dog attack, OC officials say https://animalrightscafe.com/grandmother-dies-after-dog-attack-oc-officials-say/ Mon, 19 Sep 2022 17:09:01 +0000 https://animalrightscafe.com/grandmother-dies-after-dog-attack-oc-officials-say/ An 89-year-old grandmother has died after she and her grandson were attacked by dogs, Colorado officials said. An 89-year-old grandmother has died after she and her grandson, who ran for help, were attacked by dogs in Golden, Colorado, officials said. The woman died of her injuries on Sunday, Sept. 18, Emily Gedeon, the city’s communications […]]]>

An 89-year-old grandmother has died after she and her grandson were attacked by dogs, Colorado officials said.

An 89-year-old grandmother has died after she and her grandson were attacked by dogs, Colorado officials said.

An 89-year-old grandmother has died after she and her grandson, who ran for help, were attacked by dogs in Golden, Colorado, officials said.

The woman died of her injuries on Sunday, Sept. 18, Emily Gedeon, the city’s communications and community engagement manager, confirmed in an email to McClatchy News.

She said there were no updates available on the boy’s condition.

During the September 14 attack, the 12-year-old ran to a neighbor for help, McClatchy News previously reported. Responding officers found a trail of blood leading to a house and also found two dogs attacking the woman in the backyard.

Police resorted to the use of “less lethal tasers and shotguns” in an attempt to free the woman from the dogs after verbal commands failed, according to a news release. Once again the officers arrived, they were able to rescue the woman.

The woman suffered serious injuries and was taken to a local hospital, while the boy was taken to hospital with serious injuries, police said.

The dogs were taken to a veterinary hospital, police said. One dog was “euthanized due to injuries” following the attack, while the other was being held at an animal shelter, police said.

Golden is about 15 miles northwest of Denver.

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This dog went from being tethered to a kennel in 113-degree weather to living the dream of a rescue pup https://animalrightscafe.com/this-dog-went-from-being-tethered-to-a-kennel-in-113-degree-weather-to-living-the-dream-of-a-rescue-pup/ Fri, 16 Sep 2022 13:35:58 +0000 https://animalrightscafe.com/this-dog-went-from-being-tethered-to-a-kennel-in-113-degree-weather-to-living-the-dream-of-a-rescue-pup/ When this animal rescue spotted a pup tied to a kennel outside in 113 degrees, they knew they couldn’t just leave him there. Without access to food, water or air conditioning, the poor girl was in obvious distress. She was panting and shaking and was not being properly cared for. @ellirescues Welcome Maggie to Sky […]]]>


When this animal rescue spotted a pup tied to a kennel outside in 113 degrees, they knew they couldn’t just leave him there. Without access to food, water or air conditioning, the poor girl was in obvious distress. She was panting and shaking and was not being properly cared for.

@ellirescues Welcome Maggie to Sky Sanctuary! #puppy #skysanctuary #rescued #rescue #animalrescue #adoptme #dogs #cute ♬ Hold On – Extreme Music

After finding his owner, it didn’t take long to convince him to let them have it and take his. He agreed to let them take her “as long as they take good care of her”.

@ellirescues Maggie would like a forever home❤#puppy #skysanctuary #rescued #rescue #animalrescue #adoptme #dogs #cute ♬ abcdefu – GAYLE

Back at the animal shelter, they cleaned her up and gave her a refreshing, well-deserved bath. After being neglected, she appreciated all the cuddles and attention she received!

“I can’t believe she lived outside in 113 degrees,” her rescuers said.

@ellirescues This is rescue❤ #puppy #skysanctuary #rescueme #rescued #dogs #animalrescue #cute #puppies #dog ♬ Hold On – Extreme Music

Thanks to the amazing work of Sky Sanctuary Rescue, this pup will never be left outside in the heat again. The rescue is currently looking for their forever loving home!

Sky Sanctuary Rescue is a non-profit organization specializing in the humane capture and rescue of stray, fearful and injured animals from the streets of Phoenix, Arizona. You can donate here to help them in their mission!

While we cannot change the horrific treatment many animals have already endured in the past, we can give animals a voice and hold perpetrators accountable for crimes now and in the future. Many animal abusers are not held accountable by law, which fuels this horrible cycle of abuse.

You can sign this petition calling on all states to make all animal abuse a crime!

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Two dogs rescued from the war in Ukraine and equipped with wheelchairs are finally ready forever https://animalrightscafe.com/two-dogs-rescued-from-the-war-in-ukraine-and-equipped-with-wheelchairs-are-finally-ready-forever/ Wed, 14 Sep 2022 13:38:13 +0000 https://animalrightscafe.com/two-dogs-rescued-from-the-war-in-ukraine-and-equipped-with-wheelchairs-are-finally-ready-forever/ Two brave dogs named Johnny and Phoenix were rescued from war in Ukraine and are now ready for adoption after being given wheelchairs. Source: Walking Pets/YouTube Breaking the Chains Animal Rescue (BTC) found the dogs during the ongoing Russian invasion of Ukraine. The dogs were injured and Walkin’ Pets, a pet mobility company, reported finding […]]]>


Two brave dogs named Johnny and Phoenix were rescued from war in Ukraine and are now ready for adoption after being given wheelchairs.

Source: Walking Pets/YouTube

Breaking the Chains Animal Rescue (BTC) found the dogs during the ongoing Russian invasion of Ukraine. The dogs were injured and Walkin’ Pets, a pet mobility company, reported finding Johnny, who had been shot by the Russian military and left stuck with his hind legs paralyzed. By the time rescuers got to Johnny, the brave pup had pulled himself a full two miles with just the strength of his front paws. Phoenix, on the other hand, was hit by an airstrike. The poor dog lost his hind legs and injured one of his front legs.

Thanks to the rescuers, the two dogs survived and they were cared for by BTC, who worked with an animal shelter in Ukraine to look after the dogs. When the dogs arrived, BTC knew they needed to contact Walkin’ Pets to start packing wheelchairs for the couple. Walkin’ Pets donated a wheelchair to each dog to help them learn to walk again.

Being the smart puppies that they are, Johnny and Phoenix picked up the skill quickly and are both walking again, thanks to organizations. Now they are ready to be adopted. Their future families need to know that they will need extra help because of their injuries.

To learn more about Johnny and Phoenix’s adoption and to donate to BTC to help rescue them, check out their Facebook page.

So much innocent lives were lostcountless volunteers help save animals across the countryand many people are staying put to help feed hundreds of refugees every day. The impact of The Russian invasion was devastating to the environment and the global food supply and even caused mass deaths of animals like these dolphins in the Black Sea. Activists around the world stand up for the Ukrainian people and demanding an end to this war. Sign this petition stand with Ukraine and verify 10 ways to help people and animals in Ukraine!

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For more content on animals, earth, life, vegan food, health and recipes published daily, subscribe to the Newsletter A Green Planet! Also don’t forget to download Food monster app on the App Store. With over 20,000 delicious recipes, this is the largest resource of meat-free, vegan and hypoallergenic recipes to help you reduce your environmental footprint, save animals and get healthy! Finally, public funding gives us a greater chance of continuing to provide you with high-quality content. Please consider support us by making a donation!






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“He’s just the best dog” https://animalrightscafe.com/hes-just-the-best-dog/ Sun, 11 Sep 2022 13:01:00 +0000 https://animalrightscafe.com/hes-just-the-best-dog/ By COLLEEN CURRAN, Richmond Times-Dispatch RICHMOND, Va. (AP) — When Annette Marchioli first adopted Gracie, a 4-year-old beagle rescued from the Envigo breeding facility, she was so shy and scared she was shaking and losing handfuls of hair. “She looked so pitiful and puny,” Marchioli said of the first time she saw Gracie. “Tommy DeSanto […]]]>

By COLLEEN CURRAN, Richmond Times-Dispatch

RICHMOND, Va. (AP) — When Annette Marchioli first adopted Gracie, a 4-year-old beagle rescued from the Envigo breeding facility, she was so shy and scared she was shaking and losing handfuls of hair.

“She looked so pitiful and puny,” Marchioli said of the first time she saw Gracie. “Tommy DeSanto of the Richmond SPCA carried her in his arms. She was so small and shy. His cock did not come out between his legs.

But after just a few days at her new family’s home in Henrico County’s Lakeside neighborhood, with the help of her new beagle brother Rocky, Gracie grew “by leaps and bounds,” Marchioli said.

“I thought it would take her years to adjust, but within days we saw her tail coming out of between her legs. She’s tail wagging. She’s so loving and cozy. She’s the best cuddler Marchioli said.

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Gracie is one of 4,000 beagles rescued in July from overcrowded and unsanitary conditions at the Envigo breeding facility in Cumberland County.

Described as a “house of horrors”, Envigo housed thousands of beagles in inhumane conditions. In a lawsuit filed in federal court, authorities said they were held in filthy conditions, fed moldy food and suffered from untreated medical conditions. The dogs spent their lives in cages, never putting their paws on the grass. Some beagles were euthanized without pain relief, and others were left for dead.

But in an “unprecedented case”, Envigo agreed to release 4,000 beagles from the factory and halt operations. The US government worked quickly to transfer the dogs to the Humane Society of the United States, which works with shelters and organizations across the country to place dogs and puppies up for adoption.

In national news, even Prince Harry and Meghan Markle have adopted a rescue beagle named Mia from the Virginia breeding facility.

In the Richmond area, Envigo beagles have arrived at the Richmond SPCA, Richmond Animal Care and Control, Powhatan County Animal Control, Fredericksburg Regional SPCA, and Green Dogs Unleashed, to name a few- one.

Richmond Animal Care and Control has received 84 beagles to date, and the shelter still has 41 dogs at the end of August. The moms and puppies are currently in foster care, with the puppies waiting to be old enough to be put up for adoption, which usually lasts about eight weeks.

“Many of the puppies we received in July were literally only a day old,” said Robin Young, spokesperson for the RACC. Once puppies reach eight weeks of age, they’re ready to be weaned, vaccinated and scheduled to be spayed or neutered, Young said.

The RACC said the shelter will post the dogs on social media when they are available for adoption with instructions on how to apply.

Homeward Trails, an Alexandria-based rescue center, was one of the first shelters in Virginia to receive about 500 beagles from the Envigo facility.

“The first night after we announced we would have some of the beagles, I woke up to over 1,000 emails. And that continued every day for three weeks. I was getting emails from people as far away as Australia and Puerto Rico wishing to adopt these dogs,” said Sue Bell, executive director of the shelter.

Bell said that like Annette Marchioli and her husband, Ron Stilwell’s, experience with Gracie, adult beagles are often shy and timid at first, but they adapt quickly.

“The most rewarding thing is seeing them put their feet on the grass for the first time – watching their little brains start processing, put their noses to the ground and run. They were running and jumping like deer. had never done before,” Bell said.

Homeward Trails gave the dogs a “spa day” and their first baths. This was followed by a Netflix party, where they called for volunteers to sit down and watch “Homeward Bound” and snuggle up with the beagles in their new beds.

“I’ve been doing this for 20 years, and it was absolutely one of the best nights of my life,” Bell said.

She estimates the shelter spent $1,000 per Envigo beagle to prepare the dogs for adoption. These costs go to vaccines, sterilization, heartworm and medical treatments, as well as dental care.

“The dogs came at us with horrible teeth. Each dog required dental cleaning or extraction, which cost between $300 and $800,” Bell said. All of these beagles have since been placed for adoption.

Some of the adult beagles have trouble with house training, walking on a leash, or going up and down stairs. But shelters encourage new owners to be patient.

“We still have problems with Gracie. She seems really worried about the food: getting it and protecting it,” Marchioli said. “She still has accidents at home, but we’ve only had her for two weeks. So the positives outweigh everything else.

Christi Hast and her husband, Justin, adopted a 3-year-old beagle named Dita from the Richmond SPCA to join their “pack” of three other beagles and hunting dogs.

“She’s an amazing dog, very happy and fun, so easy going, really sweet and cuddly. She’s super confident, not shy at all,” said Christi Hast. Like many of Envigo’s adult dogs, Dita has a six-letter green serial number tattooed inside one of his ears.

“I know a lot of people want puppies, but I think it’s important not to forget about mom dogs. They are really wonderful and lovable pets,” Christi Hast said.

She and her husband live in Gum Spring, County Goochland, with plenty of land for the dogs to walk and play. “I think having other dogs around has helped her thrive,” she said.

“This is truly an unprecedented case and one of the largest dog rescue efforts ever coordinated,” Bell said. “Knowing that these dogs will have the life they deserve and not languish in cages for the rest of their lives is so rewarding.”

Another positive is that the public learns more about how beagles are used in medical research. Envigo is the second-largest breeder of dogs for medical research and breeds about 25 percent of beagles used in medical and pharmaceutical research in the United States, according to the Los Angeles Times.

“I’ve had so many people tell me they didn’t know beagles were used for medical research,” Bell said. “We hope to harness this momentum and educate the public.”

And while interest in Envigo beagles remains high, shelters in Richmond — and rescue dog owners like Hast — are urging prospective pet owners to consider adopting one of the thousands of dogs available in the shelters in the region.

“Several thousand more dogs are left homeless for a number of other unrelated reasons, but still need good homes,” said Tamsen Kingry, CEO of the Richmond SPCA. “Visiting a shelter or shelter in search of your next pet is always the best decision you can make.”

Copyright 2022 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

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British Columbia’s International Animal Rescue will be severely affected by dog ​​bans from some countries https://animalrightscafe.com/british-columbias-international-animal-rescue-will-be-severely-affected-by-dog-bans-from-some-countries/ Sat, 10 Sep 2022 00:44:52 +0000 https://animalrightscafe.com/british-columbias-international-animal-rescue-will-be-severely-affected-by-dog-bans-from-some-countries/ Alana Wood On September 28, the federal government’s ban on dogs from countries considered high in rabies will go into effect until further notice. These “commercial dogs” are those considered “intended for purposes such as gift/transfer to another person, resale, adoption, placement, breeding, display or exhibition and research “. according to the Canadian government. Some […]]]>
Alana Wood

On September 28, the federal government’s ban on dogs from countries considered high in rabies will go into effect until further notice.

These “commercial dogs” are those considered “intended for purposes such as gift/transfer to another person, resale, adoption, placement, breeding, display or exhibition and research “. according to the Canadian government.

Some businesses and organizations in BC that are in the business of getting these dogs off the streets of their home country and then finding them homes with grateful owners will have to go out of business and could end up going out of business.

Fur Bae is just one of those organizations that operate inside and outside of British Columbia. It is a voluntary non-profit organization that brings dogs from Qatar to the west coast.

In Qatar’s capital, Doha, there are many dogs in need of homes and Fur Bae co-founders Laura Elliott and Jenni Baynham recognized the symbiotic relationship they could build between Qatar and North America.

Qatar is a dangerous country for a dog – many of the animals Fur Bae tries to help have been victims of stoning, shootings and general abuse.

They started by simply bringing dogs to Vancouver, but have since expanded to also have representation and adoptable pets in Victoria, Montreal and Seattle.

However, with the upcoming dog trade ban, Fur Bae and many other international rescues will have to cease operations.

“What happens in Qatar is that dogs are taken from the streets into the shelter, for safety reasons,” said Lizzie Parrot, Fur Bae’s volunteer coordinator for Vancouver Island.

“The new ban is heartbreaking.”

“Rescuers like us will take the dogs from the shelter and find homes for them, whether that be foster homes to start with and then adoptive homes after that. So basically what’s happening with the ban is that no dogs can be removed from shelters. Which means these dogs will die or be killed.

In British Columbia and most of Canada, skunks, raccoons and bats are the main causes of rabies. Organizations like Fur Bae were struck with confusion when the United States banned commercial dogs for the same reason on June 10, 2022.

Since then, they knew there was a possibility that Canada would impose a similar ban on commercial dogs.

“We just wish that international rescues could have been consulted on the structure responsible,” Parrot told Victoria Buzz. “We would have been, as a rescue, more than happy to work with the CDC to make that happen.”

Parrot said that as an organization, Fur Bae wants to urge the CDC to work with the relief community on the process instead of the current blanket ban on animals from designated countries of which there are more than 100.

International rescues like Fur Bae fear that once the ban goes into effect and they can no longer meet the need for ethically-sourced dogs in safe homes, puppy mills will fill that void and won’t. with responsible practice or checks and balances.

“We have staff veterinary care to complete. They are fully vaccinated before their arrival. Um, we have behavioral trainers, we always provide free, free training to help dogs settle in,” Parrot said. “It’s a community.”

Fur Bae has found safe, compassionate homes for over 340 dogs from Qatar and shortly before the ban comes into effect on September 28, they are focused on finding safe accommodation as much as they can.

Currently, Fur Bae hasn’t had the difficult conversation about next steps as an organization. However, Parrot said they will eventually “help where it’s needed most”.

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