Animal Volunteer – Animal Rights Cafe http://animalrightscafe.com/ Mon, 03 Oct 2022 01:35:00 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://animalrightscafe.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-6-150x150.png Animal Volunteer – Animal Rights Cafe http://animalrightscafe.com/ 32 32 Sioux Empire Pit Rescue to house dogs displaced by the aftermath of Hurricane Ian https://animalrightscafe.com/sioux-empire-pit-rescue-to-house-dogs-displaced-by-the-aftermath-of-hurricane-ian/ Mon, 03 Oct 2022 01:35:00 +0000 https://animalrightscafe.com/sioux-empire-pit-rescue-to-house-dogs-displaced-by-the-aftermath-of-hurricane-ian/ SIOUX FALLS, SD (Dakota News Now) – The Sioux Empire Pit Rescue is working to help foster dogs across the country in areas that need help. Right now, animal foster homes in Georgia and Florida are overcrowded and stressed. With the lack of resources available, Sioux Empire Pit Rescue is answering the call to make […]]]>

SIOUX FALLS, SD (Dakota News Now) – The Sioux Empire Pit Rescue is working to help foster dogs across the country in areas that need help.

Right now, animal foster homes in Georgia and Florida are overcrowded and stressed.

With the lack of resources available, Sioux Empire Pit Rescue is answering the call to make a difference in the lives of displaced dogs.

“We specifically take dogs from high need areas which is why we are currently looking for foster families. we have ten dogs from Georgia, Hazeltine Georgia and this is a program that we take dogs out of so that they can come here and we can adopt them into loving homes,” said volunteer Ashley Bartholomaus.

They say natural disasters like this cause a domino effect of animal refugees in states surrounding the affected area.

“I think any time there’s a large-scale event like a tropical storm or a hurricane, it puts a lot of pressure on those smaller rescues that are already having funding issues or overcrowding,” Bartholomaus said.

However, there must first be foster homes set up for these dogs locally before transporting them.

“We’re running out of foster homes to raise them here, so we’re waiting for people to open their homes and their hearts so we can commit to bringing all of these dogs here,” Bartholomaus said.

Sioux Empire Pit Rescue will help anyone who responds.

“We cover medical costs and most important things, food can be covered and then we provide all the treats,” said volunteer Melissa Renes.

To foster a dog or volunteer, you can follow the link at https://www.pitrescue.org/

]]>
Sea lions battle deadly disease on California’s southern coast https://animalrightscafe.com/sea-lions-battle-deadly-disease-on-californias-southern-coast/ Fri, 30 Sep 2022 00:14:25 +0000 https://animalrightscafe.com/sea-lions-battle-deadly-disease-on-californias-southern-coast/ SANTA BARBARA, Calif. – Off a beach in Summerland lies a distressed California sea lion. “She has domoic acid toxicosis, she has mild seizures. Her eyes are twitching and bulging, and she has a lot of foam coming out of her mouth. These are typical symptoms that we see with this disease,” said Jen Levine […]]]>

SANTA BARBARA, Calif. – Off a beach in Summerland lies a distressed California sea lion.

“She has domoic acid toxicosis, she has mild seizures. Her eyes are twitching and bulging, and she has a lot of foam coming out of her mouth. These are typical symptoms that we see with this disease,” said Jen Levine of the Channel Islands Marine and Wildlife Institute.

Levine leads the Channel Islands Marine and Wildlife Institute (CIMWI) rescue team to save the sick animal.

“We’ve been seeing animals with a very poor prognosis and very high mortality since August 15,” Levine said.

In the past month alone, more than 266 sea lions have been discovered locally suffering from domoic acid toxicosis, a number that hits home for rescuers like Ken Hughes.

“This is the worst domoic acid outbreak I’ve seen…we love them, and it’s really hard for us to see that,” Hughes said.

“We are going to capture this animal and give it a sedative. It makes it less stressful for her and it makes it safer for rescuers,” Levine said.

The team transported the adult female sea lion, named number 175.

“We number them. We don’t name them, because they’re wild animals. They’re not our pets,” Levine said.

She was taken to the CIMWI rehabilitation center for treatment, and number 175 is no longer alone.

She is in good company with other sea lions suffering from the same disease.

“I’m also there with a crisis hotline and … when I say Ventura and Santa Barbara county beaches … we run the beaches from sunrise to sunset,” said the volunteer veterinarian Jacob Bryan of CIMWI. .

Bryan said sea lions are sentinel species, meaning they tell us about the state of the ocean.

“So with this domoic acid crisis, it translates very well to humans, because we can get the same poisoning from eating shellfish,” Bryan said.

Bryan said this should be a wake-up call for humans to take care of where these sea creatures call home: the ocean.

“Do things like don’t litter…don’t put stuff down the storm drain…because these things all affect the health of our ocean, and that’s the only place these animals need to live,” Levine said. .

As the sea lions begin to recover, Levine admits they may be a handful, “They’re gregarious…some of them are very rude!”

After all, they are wild by nature.

But she loves sea lions and hopes to give everyone a chance at a good life.

“It’s just awesome to see them progress through rehabilitation…to get big, fat and healthy…and back to nature,” Levine said.

CIMWI is currently recruiting volunteers willing to help save sea lions at the rescue center.

For more information on how you can help save California sea lions, visit cimwi.org.

]]>
Hi-Tor Animal Shelter Replacement: Proposed Haverstraw Site https://animalrightscafe.com/hi-tor-animal-shelter-replacement-proposed-haverstraw-site/ Mon, 26 Sep 2022 09:12:40 +0000 https://animalrightscafe.com/hi-tor-animal-shelter-replacement-proposed-haverstraw-site/ HAVERSTRAW — The primary option to house the new Countywide Rockland Animal Sanctuary would cost significantly less than the projected $18 million price tag to build a new facility, officials said. Haverstraw supervisor Howard Phillips said a newly built warehouse on Beach Road could cost up to $5 million to buy and could be retrofitted […]]]>

HAVERSTRAW — The primary option to house the new Countywide Rockland Animal Sanctuary would cost significantly less than the projected $18 million price tag to build a new facility, officials said.

Haverstraw supervisor Howard Phillips said a newly built warehouse on Beach Road could cost up to $5 million to buy and could be retrofitted to accommodate stray cats, dogs, rabbits and other animals. He said the five cities could either buy the 15,000 square foot building, lease the site or enter into a lease-to-own agreement. Completion of the project would stretch to 2023.

The abandoned county plan called for the construction of a facility near the Hi-Tor Animal Center site across from the Rockland Fire Training Center near Route 45 in Ramapo. Supervisors and some county lawmakers balked at the county-led project when the projected price rose from $8 million to $18 million due to rising construction costs and other economic factors.

Animal shelter: The abandoned Rockland County Hi-Tor animal shelter reconstruction plan

Hi Tor: Upcoming change of direction: what is proposed, when it can happen

Hi Tor: Animal sanctuary president charged with 18 counts related to facility operations

“We can do something for less money than $18 million to $20 million,” Phillips said. “We have an existing building that can be retrofitted. The owner is interested in $4-5 million.”

]]>
Golden Gate Express | Wags for Wellness works to relieve stressed students https://animalrightscafe.com/golden-gate-express-wags-for-wellness-works-to-relieve-stressed-students/ Sat, 24 Sep 2022 03:39:53 +0000 https://animalrightscafe.com/golden-gate-express-wags-for-wellness-works-to-relieve-stressed-students/ SF State’s Health and Wellness Promotion Unit works in conjunction with the San Francisco Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals to comfort students through the use of therapy dogs. Every Thursday from 12:30 p.m. to 1:30 p.m., volunteers walk the dogs at different locations on campus. “Therapy dogs are a perfect way to […]]]>

SF State’s Health and Wellness Promotion Unit works in conjunction with the San Francisco Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals to comfort students through the use of therapy dogs.

Every Thursday from 12:30 p.m. to 1:30 p.m., volunteers walk the dogs at different locations on campus.

“Therapy dogs are a perfect way to come in, pet dogs, and relax,” said SF State student and Wags for Wellness volunteer Monica Sabelja. “I think overall it makes students happier throughout the day.”

According to HPW’s Senior Mental Health Education Coordinator, Vincent Lam, the Wags for Wellness program was inspired by the scientific finding that interactions with animals actually decrease stress.

“For those who are under stress, it usually helps reduce the stress response that occurs,” Lam said. “Generally, interaction with animals has been shown to lower cortisol levels and lower blood pressure.”

Sabelja thinks the shift from online college attendance during the pandemic to returning in person has been a difficult challenge for all students to overcome.

“Someone was talking about living on campus and not being allowed to bring their pet,” Sabelja said. “So it was like a way for them to remember what it was like to have a pet.”

Kyle Mullins, HPW student leader and member of the mental health team, also believes that this program calls for the SF State community to come together after being online.

“I feel like this event is an opportunity to bring back a community since everything is online,” Mullins said. “[It’s a] great opportunity to bring everyone together.

Although this event featured therapy dogs, the Wags for Wellness program is not specific to dogs alone.

“When available, we’ve brought in therapy cats, pigs, and rabbits in the past,” Lam said. “It’s usually in the context of a counseling framework, but we apply the same idea in the context of prevention and community wellness promotion.”

HPW was able to make this possible thanks to SF State’s long history with the SF SPCA.

“Their animal-assisted therapy program has a volunteer coordinator, who we work with to arrange visits,” Lam said. “We usually ask for at least two teams and for larger events we may ask for more if possible.”

The variety of dogs depends on the pool of volunteers. Because this is an SF SPCA volunteer program, SF State does not request specific dogs.

Roman, a certified therapy Australian Shepherd, calmly sits for students to pet him as part of the SF State Health Promotion & Wellness Unit’s Wags for Wellness event in front of the Student Services Building on Sept. 22, 2022 Roman and other certified dog therapy are available for students to spend time with in order to relieve stress and anxiety. (Tatyana Ekmekjian / Golden Gate Xpress) (Tatyana Ekmekjian)

“It’s not uncommon for them to ask to visit our campus and come back several times a semester,” Lam said. “Sometimes when not all dates are filled, we can contact teams who know our campus to see if they are available to help us.”

In addition to working with the SF SPCA organization, HPW also works with the SF State Enterprise Risk Management team to ensure HPW has insurance documentation when working with animals.

“SF SPCA must provide an up-to-date insurance certificate before visiting our campus,” Lam said. “It addresses the safety and liability aspects of risk management.”

According to Lam, the goal of Wags for Wellness is tied to HPW’s goal of increasing social support for mental health, mental health promotion, and fostering a community with a sense of belonging for students. of SF State.

“This is one of the activities that helps us increase mental health promotion and self-care opportunities for students campus-wide, with a particular focus on stress and stress relief,” Lam said.

The following an event will be located at the Quad at HPW’s Fun Fest on October 6th.

]]>
Denver awarded Guinness World Record title for world’s largest airport therapy animal program https://animalrightscafe.com/denver-awarded-guinness-world-record-title-for-worlds-largest-airport-therapy-animal-program/ Thu, 22 Sep 2022 02:00:00 +0000 https://animalrightscafe.com/denver-awarded-guinness-world-record-title-for-worlds-largest-airport-therapy-animal-program/ Denver International Airport IATA/ICAO code: DEN/KDEN Country: United States CEO: Philip A.Washington Number of passengers : 58,828,552 (2021) Tracks : 7/25 – 3,658 m (12,000 ft) |8/26 – 3,658 m (12,000 ft) |16L/34R – 3,658 m (12,000 ft) |16R/34L – 4,877 m (16,000 ft) ) |17L/35R – 3658 m (12,000 ft) |17R/35L – 3658 m […]]]>

  • Denver International Conspiracy Theories

    Denver International Airport

    IATA/ICAO code:
    DEN/KDEN

    Country:
    United States

    CEO:
    Philip A.Washington

    Number of passengers :
    58,828,552 (2021)

    Tracks :
    7/25 – 3,658 m (12,000 ft) |8/26 – 3,658 m (12,000 ft) |16L/34R – 3,658 m (12,000 ft) |16R/34L – 4,877 m (16,000 ft) ) |17L/35R – 3658 m (12,000 ft) |17R/35L – 3658 m (12,000 ft)

Denver International Airport just received the Guinness World Record for having the largest airport pet therapy program in the world. DEN became famous for its large team of therapy animals. The animals and their handlers are part of the Airport Canine Airport Therapy Squad (CATS). The unique unit is designed to help nervous travelers be more comfortable during their travel experience. The teams consist of an animal and a dog handler who move around the airport to visit passengers in order to brighten their days and make the flight less stressful.

SIMPLEFLYING VIDEO OF THE DAY

A record therapy

The CATS program at Denver International Airport (DEN) currently consists of 84 animals consisting of 33 dog breeds and one cat. The program has grown significantly since its humble beginnings in 2015, when it launched its volunteer therapy services with 28 animals from 14 breeds. Throughout 2022, volunteers have contributed over 1,250 hours to the program and the teams all gathered in the Jeppesen Terminal to receive the award on September 15. The record will appear in the 2023 Guinness Book of Records.

The CATS team came together to celebrate the award. Photo: Denver International Airport

DEN CEO Phil Washington shared how grateful he and the administrative team are for their volunteer efforts and the extraordinary service provided to passengers and airport employees. He also shared how proud they were of their world record. Washington said,

“We are extremely proud of our CATS program and grateful to all of the volunteers who give their time to bring joy to our passengers and employees. The continued growth of the program is a testament to the positive impact it has on travelers, and we look forward to welcoming even more teams as we continue to grow this beloved program.”

Ironically, Denver’s CATS program only has one cat. Photo: Denver International Airport

Guinness World Records editor Adam Millward said:

“Whether it’s with a lick, a sniff or funny antics, our four-legged friends have an incredible ability to make us smile – even when we’re feeling stressed or anxious,

“The Canine Airport Therapy Squad at Denver Airport has taken this innate skill and put it to use. It’s a pleasure to be able to recognize hard working dogs and their owners who selflessly give of their time. to brighten the day of thousands of travelers every year.”

Friendly competition

In the United States, 90 airports have pet therapy programs, many of which closely follow DEN’s CATS program. The closest program is at Los Angles International Airport (LAX). LAX’s animal therapy program, known as Pets Unstressing Passengers (PUP), currently has 75 animals. PUP previously had 123 animals before the pandemic.

Pet therapy services at airports have been suspended during the pandemic. Photo: Denver International Airport

When COVID-19 restrictions were enforced, many pet therapy programs at airports were temporarily suspended. During this time, PUP lost several teams with several volunteers moving around and some dogs retreating or passing. The data recorded for the world record was collected in 2021 after the number of PUPs decreased significantly. Despite the competition, the PUP team congratulated CATS on this achievement, as both organizations seek to bring joy to others through love and service.

Airport therapy animals have become a popular asset at many airports. Photo: Denver International Airport

Another notable airport animal therapy program is found at San Jose International Airport (SJC). Following the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001, SJC launched the first airport animal therapy program in the United States to help comfort passengers. The program now has 27 animals consisting of two cats and 25 dogs.

What do you think of this world record? Let us know in the comments below.

Source: The Dots Guy, The Denver Post

]]>
FOBVK now Friends of Bay Village Community Cats – Westlake https://animalrightscafe.com/fobvk-now-friends-of-bay-village-community-cats-westlake/ Tue, 20 Sep 2022 13:45:20 +0000 https://animalrightscafe.com/fobvk-now-friends-of-bay-village-community-cats-westlake/ Friends of Bay Village Community Cats is looking for volunteers to foster kittens. Friends of the Bay Village Kennel (FOBVK) has changed its name to Friends of Bay Village Community Cats. We have long thought about the name change. FOBVK was incorporated in 2010 to help provide shelter and veterinary care to homeless pets until […]]]>

Friends of Bay Village Community Cats is looking for volunteers to foster kittens.

Friends of the Bay Village Kennel (FOBVK) has changed its name to Friends of Bay Village Community Cats. We have long thought about the name change.

FOBVK was incorporated in 2010 to help provide shelter and veterinary care to homeless pets until permanent homes are found, promote spaying and neutering and TNR (neuter trap return) and support animal rescue. At that time, the Bay Village Kennel temporarily housed cats and dogs, and FOBVK supported the kennel as a way to help Bay Village’s lost, stray, and homeless pets.

However, in August 2011, Bay Village changed its animal control policies: generally, dogs were not kept in the kennel more than one night before being transferred to the Cuyahoga County kennel, and cats were left alone. These policies continue.

Over time, our involvement with the kennel has steadily diminished, but the need to provide services on behalf of lost, stray and community cats has increased. Since the reorganization of FOBVK in February 2021, we have answered calls from more than 60 households involving more than 100 cats.

Sometimes all a resident needed was the loan of a humane trap to retrieve a lost animal. Often the problem was more complicated: Community cats would end up in backyards, sometimes with kittens. Friends of Bay Village Community Cats is not a rescue organization, although we can help residents find a rescue organization and care for a friendly cat until the rescue has room to take cat.

Community cats live among us but have no “masters”. They may be lost, stray or unsocialized homeless cats, but unless they are neutered their population will increase rapidly. Most shelters are full, and adult cats in particular have a hard time getting adopted even if they are friendly. Unsocialized cats are not adoptable.

Friends of Bay Village Community Cats helps TNR residents cats on their property. When a cat is neutered on a TNR program, its left ear is tilted to let others know the cat has been neutered. For more information about TNR, visit clevelandapl.org and click on Programs, Services and Resources.

Successful TNR requires planning, patience and luck, especially when kittens are involved. Residents must feed the cats and kittens at a specific time and place for a certain period of time, as the trapper must know where the cats will be and the cats must search for food in order for the trapping to be successful.

If kittens are involved they should be cared for and there are many possibilities, but the mother cat should be neutered under all circumstances. If the kittens are the right age and a foster family is available, they can be picked up, socialized and placed with a rescue organization for adoption into a forever home.

If the kittens are too young to be separated from the mother, the best plan is to wait until the kittens are a little older. If the kittens are too old to be easily socialized, they are probably big enough to be TNR. A kitten can be TNR when it is at least 8 weeks old and weighs 2 pounds.

We are a small, all-volunteer 501(c)(3) organization and we count on your support. We could really use volunteers: to help with TNR, to maintain our Facebook page and help us communicate better with the community, and to foster the kittens. We are limited in the number of kittens we can save mainly by the shortage of foster homes for kittens.

Please contact us if you know of any cats in need. Maybe we can help you. Message us through Facebook, facebook.com/FriendsBVCC, or call 216-925-0534 and leave a message.

]]>
DIA’s canine therapy team broke a Guinness World Record https://animalrightscafe.com/dias-canine-therapy-team-broke-a-guinness-world-record/ Sun, 18 Sep 2022 12:00:43 +0000 https://animalrightscafe.com/dias-canine-therapy-team-broke-a-guinness-world-record/ If you’ve ever encountered a therapy animal at Denver International Airport, chances are it’s an airport employee. The Canine Animal Therapy Squad (CATS) has been calming the nervous flyers since October 29, 2015 (National Cat Day, everyday), with 28 members from 14 breeds. “Today the program includes 84 members and 33 breeds plus one cat […]]]>

If you’ve ever encountered a therapy animal at Denver International Airport, chances are it’s an airport employee.

The Canine Animal Therapy Squad (CATS) has been calming the nervous flyers since October 29, 2015 (National Cat Day, everyday), with 28 members from 14 breeds. “Today the program includes 84 members and 33 breeds plus one cat (and, of course, their human handlers),” airport officials wrote.

Despite a pandemic of ‘paws’ (their language, not ours, but we love it!), the CATS program has resumed with teams having donated more than 1,250 hours of time so far in 2022, officials said. responsible.

On Thursday, September 15, the 80+ member team received its due as the largest airport pet therapy team in the world. It’s a niche title, of course, but also verified by the Guinness Book of World Records. The dogs and their handlers gathered on Level 5 of the Jeppesen Terminal on Thursday morning to celebrate the four-legged friends and receive a plaque for the title, which will appear in the 2023 book.

“We are extremely proud of our CATS program and grateful to all of the volunteers who give their time to bring joy to our passengers and employees,” DIA CEO Phil Washington said in a press release. “The continued growth of the program is a testament to the positive impact it has on travelers, and we look forward to welcoming even more teams as we continue to grow this beloved program.”

]]>
Lake Humane Society brings animals to visit seniors at Mentor Assisted Living Center https://animalrightscafe.com/lake-humane-society-brings-animals-to-visit-seniors-at-mentor-assisted-living-center/ Fri, 16 Sep 2022 21:04:00 +0000 https://animalrightscafe.com/lake-humane-society-brings-animals-to-visit-seniors-at-mentor-assisted-living-center/ September 16 – The Enclave of Newell Creek, an assisted living facility in Mentor, this week partnered with the Lake Humane Society to bring in dogs and kittens to brighten their residents’ day. Jessica Dougherty, director of sales and marketing at The Enclave, said National Assisted Living Week went into effect Sept. 10 with the […]]]>

September 16 – The Enclave of Newell Creek, an assisted living facility in Mentor, this week partnered with the Lake Humane Society to bring in dogs and kittens to brighten their residents’ day.

Jessica Dougherty, director of sales and marketing at The Enclave, said National Assisted Living Week went into effect Sept. 10 with the goal of celebrating joy with the customers they assist.

“Our theme this year is to celebrate joy and our residents love puppies, so we reached out to the Lake Humane Society to host an event and they jumped at the idea,” Dougherty said. “Every time we bring animals, it brightens their day. It’s amazing to see the happiness they bring.”

The Humane Society volunteers brought their Bourbon and Bistro pooches, a pair of 3-4 year old dogs who lovingly roamed the center wings wagging their tails enthusiastically. Accompanying Bourbon and Bistro was the kitten Football, a cat born without a tail that was passed on to seniors so that they had fun petting the little feline.

Lake Humane Society and Enclave encourage residents to adopt a pet, not only to provide their dogs and cats with a loving home, but also to enrich residents’ lives and help boost their mental health.

“We love working with the Lake Humane Society. They do a fantastic job and they really know how to put a smile on our residents’ faces,” Dougherty said. “We always look forward to events like this to see the smiles from our residents and the little furry friends they bring too.”

The Enclave has several residents who currently own pets in their homes and apartments.

“Everyone appreciates animals,” said Lake Humane Society volunteer Nancy Irle. “Bourbon and Bistro are great ambassadors for us. There’s nothing better than seeing how happy they make people.”

The Humane Society Shelter, located at 7564 Tyler Blvd., has a variety of animals for adoption, including Bistro, Bourbon, and Football. All of their animals have received fully up-to-date vaccinations and are neutered and neutered. In addition, their animals are microchipped so that they can be tracked in case of loss.

Anyone wishing to adopt a pet can contact the organization at 440-951-6122.

]]>
Rutherford County Schools https://animalrightscafe.com/rutherford-county-schools/ Wed, 14 Sep 2022 22:21:09 +0000 https://animalrightscafe.com/rutherford-county-schools/ September 14, 2022 By JAMES EVANSRutherford County Schools Outside the school on the Homer Pittard campus on Friday morning, there was a scene that some might call eerie. It started with a group of proud kindergarten students, followed by first grade, second grade and so on. Some wore hats that looked like chickens, others displayed […]]]>

September 14, 2022

By JAMES EVANS
Rutherford County Schools

Outside the school on the Homer Pittard campus on Friday morning, there was a scene that some might call eerie.

It started with a group of proud kindergarten students, followed by first grade, second grade and so on.

Some wore hats that looked like chickens, others displayed handmade posters of chickens, and all sported big smiles.

A teacher or parent volunteer from each group confidently carried a real hen, while other parents lined the road in front of the school, cheering on their children and taking pictures.

The event was dubbed the “Campus School Chicken Parade” and was meant to celebrate the return of one of students’ favorite enrichment programs.

The chicken project has been a staple of Campus School for many years. At the height of the COVID-19 pandemic, however, the program had to be halted and the original chickens were adopted.

But thanks to the efforts of many, the program has returned to everyone’s delight.

The hens live in a chicken coop on the school’s kindergarten yard, and in addition to playing and petting them, students will eventually be responsible for their care and upkeep.

“Right now I’m supervising them making sure the hens have fresh food and water every day, and collecting the eggs,” said kindergarten teacher Melissa Flowers, who led the program for years with his fellow teachers. “They also wrap the eggs in the cartons for our True Blue Celebration giveaways. Eventually, the children will take the lead in caring for the chickens.

The school’s parent-teacher club played an “instrumental” role in bringing the original project to fruition, and they funded the cost of the original herd and building the co-op, Flowers said. The PTC then helped support the restart of the project, funding an addition to the co-op and the necessary supplies.

But everyone contributed.

School Resource Officer Kerry Nelson made repairs to the co-op, and a former campus school family helped build an addition. Flowers worked with Windy Willette, the little animal science teacher at Blackman High, last spring to get new chicks from a sweet and friendly breed.

Each class adopted a chicken and chose a name. The chickens are Bubbles, Marshmallow, Dolly, Nugget, Pepper and finally, Princess Laya.

To support the project, the school is soliciting donations for food and supplies, and parents have signed up to keep the project going during holidays and weekends.

“The animal science program at MTSU is always helpful and now we also have the BHS animal science program on board,” Flowers said. “It’s really been a community effort.”

Campus School is one of eight elective school programs offered by Rutherford County Schools.

The school building is owned by Middle Tennessee State University, and the academic program is a partnership between the school district and the university. The school serves as a lab school for the university, and education majors work alongside campus school teachers to hone their classroom skills and provide additional resources for students.

The school prides itself on cultivating relationships and providing experiences for students, said Principal Sherry King.

The chicken project is an example of such opportunities.

“It’s unique in the way the community comes together, it’s such a special thing,” King said. “They all take care of the chickens and the kids have these hands-on experiences with the chickens. It’s like being part of a big family.

It’s part of the school’s culture, King and Flowers said, adding that students become very attached to the chickens in addition to just caring for them.

In fact, it’s not uncommon to see students riding down a toboggan or riding a tricycle while holding the chickens.

“Kids love chickens,” Flowers said. “They really become part of the classroom and the school community. They are like our pets. It’s really adorable how much the kids love them.

PICTURES / JAMES EVANS

(1) Students, parents and staff held a parade on Friday to show off their new flock of chickens. Each class named a chicken for a total of six.

(2) Kindergarten teacher Melissa Flowers holds bubbles. Kindergarten children will learn how to care for and maintain chickens throughout the school year.

(3) Six in all, the new Campus School hens are Bubbles, Marshmallow, Dolly, Nugget, Pepper and Princess Laya.

]]>
Dogs, beer and music: Barktoberfest returns to Michigan https://animalrightscafe.com/dogs-beer-and-music-barktoberfest-returns-to-michigan/ Mon, 12 Sep 2022 13:44:41 +0000 https://animalrightscafe.com/dogs-beer-and-music-barktoberfest-returns-to-michigan/ (Photo credit: FluxFactory/Getty Images) The temperatures are starting to drop and the leaves are just starting to change. Yes, fall is fast approaching, and with it comes a celebration of the changing seasons. Over the weekend, the city of Royal Oak, Michigan hosted one of its most popular fall festivals: Barktoberfest. “We usually host between […]]]>

(Photo credit: FluxFactory/Getty Images)

The temperatures are starting to drop and the leaves are just starting to change. Yes, fall is fast approaching, and with it comes a celebration of the changing seasons. Over the weekend, the city of Royal Oak, Michigan hosted one of its most popular fall festivals: Barktoberfest.

“We usually host between 3,000 and 5,000 people,” explained Shelly Kemp, executive director of the Royal Oak Chamber of Commerce, before the event. “It’s beer, music and dogs.”

A long-awaited return

Organized by the Royal Oak Chamber of Commerce, Barktoberfest is now in its sixth year. According their website, Barktoberfest is “centered on dogs and their parents, with locally brewed beers and live music.” Unfortunately, the event was canceled for two years due to the COVID-19 pandemic. Now the event is back for 2022 and has received attendance records.

The weekend featured a long list of local breweries and vendors selling everything from home brewing supplies to bottle cap art. Meanwhile, a central stage presented 8 hours of live music on Friday and Saturday.

But it wouldn’t be Barktoberfest without the dog-centric events that people came for. Contests for puppies of all ages and sizes filled the festival to the brim. Dog parents have entered their canine companions into costume contests, best trick contests, sausage dog races, and even a puppy dash!

For the first time this year, the dogs were able to attend a foam party in a dance club. And for the hyperactive puppies, the festival included a lure course with handkerchiefs on pulleys.

Everything for a good cause

However, Barktoberfest is not only fun and playful. Dogs and beer can go hand in hand, but the weekend was also a time for local rescue shelters to come out and talk to the adoption community, fosteras well as volunteer opportunities.

On top of that, a portion of the proceeds from the event went to support two local animal rights groups: Olivier Foundation and the Detroit Dog Rescue.

]]>