Why ‘puppy breeding’ could be banned in NSW

Animal rights activists have claimed they are being ‘under attack’ by large-scale dog breeders spreading ‘hate, deceit and lies’ trying to discredit them ahead of the election.

Emma Hurst, a member of the Animal Justice Party, which is behind legislation banning puppy breeding in NSW, alleged dog breeders are using social media to falsely claim the real program of the party is to ban pet ownership.

Last month, the NSW government blocked its bid to ban the breeding of several types of so-called ‘flat-faced’ dogs, including pugs, French bulldogs and boxers.

Now Ms Hurst, a vegan bodybuilder, has told Daily Mail Australia that a ‘coordinated disinformation campaign’ is underway to confuse people interested in voting for animal rights in the upcoming election.

The party sought legal advice on the false messages.

Animal Justice Party member Emma Hurst has alleged dog breeders are using social media to falsely claim the party’s real agenda is to ban pet ownership (Ms Hurst is pictured with her cat Jester )

The Animal Justice Party candidate for Shortland in New South Wales with Emma Hurst

The Animal Justice Party candidate for Shortland in New South Wales with Emma Hurst

She alleged the campaign involved fake social media posts, attributing quotes to her that she never said.

Ms Hurst claims the posts were posted and shared by puppy breeders who sometimes own more than 300 dogs for breeding.

“People have been deceived by this campaign,” she said.

“I thought surely no one would believe that the AJP wants to eliminate pets, but some people are really confused by the use of fake images and quotes.”

The AJP is a major minor party in the upcoming federal election, with 67 candidates in all states, including 11 Senate candidates.

“I want to be clear, animals bring joy into our lives, we have no policy to prevent people from having pets.”

Ms Hurst has a rescue cat called Jester and says she supports people with pets, but prefers that they rescue animals to have them as pets.

Ms Hurst claims the posts were posted and shared by puppy breeders who sometimes own more than 300 dogs for breeding.  Legislation she has introduced in NSW parliament would limit the number of dogs an owner can keep to just 10

Ms Hurst claims the posts were posted and shared by puppy breeders who sometimes own more than 300 dogs for breeding. Legislation she has introduced in NSW parliament would limit the number of dogs an owner can keep to just 10

Ms Hurst said the above image shared on social media is an example of posts being shared to discredit the party.  She said he included false information and sought legal advice about it.

Ms Hurst said the above image shared on social media is an example of posts being shared to discredit the party. She said he included false information and sought legal advice about it.

Ms Hurst posted on Facebook “I am under attack”.

“Puppy breeders and lobby groups who want to stop my bill banning factory dog ​​breeding have launched a hate campaign against me in an attempt to stop support for the AJP and make me fear until silence.”

Ms Hurst has introduced a Puppy Breeding Bill in NSW Parliament which is due to be debated before August. His proposal would cap the number of breeding dogs an owner can have at 10.

‘[Opponents] having fake quotes next to pictures of me (quotes are things I never said),’ she said.

“They say I want people to take care of pets (even though I have my own rescue fur baby).

“They are trying to instill fear in the community with lies and deceit.”

She said the misinformation started being shared when she introduced puppy breeding legislation in the NSW Parliament on October 13 last year and continued with a private member’s bill. parliamentarian on the cull of convenience in the pound in February 2022.

“It accelerated and then went further before the election,” she said.

I am attacked. Puppy breeders and lobby groups who want to stop my bill banning factory factory farming…

posted by Emma Hurst on Tuesday, May 17, 2022

Mrs Hurst with a pug, one of the types of dogs that commonly suffer from brachycephalic obstructive airway syndrome (BOAS)

Mrs Hurst with a pug, one of the types of dogs that commonly suffer from brachycephalic obstructive airway syndrome (BOAS)

Why animal rights activists want to ban puppy farms

“Puppy farms condemn dogs to a life of cruelty in facilities where they are locked up, often in squalid conditions, without socialization, exercise or access to veterinary care.

These dogs give litter after litter until they are physically unable to continue and their puppies may have physical abnormalities or illnesses due to poor breeding practices or poor nutrition.

Although it is a smaller industry, cats on kitten farms also suffer similar cruelty.

– Animal Justice Day

Although Ms Hurst is a sitting NSW representative and not a federal candidate, she is one of the party’s most prominent politicians.

The abolition of puppy farms is part of the AJP’s electoral policy “Protect our pets”.

He also wants to ban live animal exports, protect koalas and kangaroos, end animal poisoning, animal experimentation and “factory farming”.

The party’s website says it “cherishes the role of pets in the average Australian family”.

“While your own cat or dog may receive constant care and affection, the sad reality is that thousands of pets are unwanted and unloved and that won’t change until we treat animals as individuals rather than as commodities.”

Meanwhile, Ms Hurst has introduced new legislation in NSW Parliament to ensure animals used for testing and experiments must be given the right to be rehomed.

“The purpose of the bill is to give dogs and cats used in animal experimentation the right to be released. This will give these animals a chance to find a loving home where they can live out their lives.

She claimed 1,000 dogs and 500 cats were still kept and used for animal testing – and are often destroyed after testing “even though they are healthy”.

She said animals are subjected to a wide range of invasive and often painful experiences.

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